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I can see the owners of my databases usign this query

SELECT  name ,
        SUSER_SNAME(owner_sid)
FROM    sys.databases

What are the things I should consider when choosing an account for database owner (account fro dbo user)? I'm thinking about a scenario when I assing normal admin account for database owner and when the time passes this account is disabled from AD when the ownwer of this account leaves his job. Is it good practice to assign a system account for database owner?

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As long as you have SA privileges, you can change the DBO at will. You can also alias whoever you want to DBO. So, overall, who exactly has DBO doesn't really matter (as long as it's not someone that shouldn't have DBO privileges). –  Simon Righarts Jan 23 '12 at 11:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I advocate having databases owned by a Windows account (login).

If using Mixed mode, sa could be used, but sa is a bit anonymous for my comfort. Users owning databases (sometimes seen on dev database servers) doesn't work in production.

Like @nopol I prefer using Windows groups to reduce the number of logins under SQL Server, but groups can't own SQL Server databases.

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It depends on the authentication mode you whish to choose:

  • if you use SQL authentication for the application, that SQL account may be assigned the dbo role at the database level.
  • if you use Windows authentication mode you might consider creating a windows group to which the dbo role could be assigned.
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I'm using Windows authentication. Why windows groups is preferred? –  jrara Jan 23 '12 at 12:58
    
This would allow to reduce the admin overhead when you user leaves or changes job as in your example. Windows is not preferred, it is a matter of choice/strategy with your development team. Hope this helps. –  nopol Jan 23 '12 at 13:01
    
just as an example, we would use SQL authentication for the application user (connection string), but we would use a windows group for the development team, who would remain dbo to provide third level support. If one developer leaves the company, nothing has to be changed SQL side. –  nopol Jan 23 '12 at 13:03

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