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Given E(ABCDE) ABC are candidate keys

Normalize into 2NF and 3NF

As far as 2NF is concerned the solution is quite easy:

E1(BD), E2(DE), E3(ABC) 

But with regard to 3NF I think I'm wrong if I say that nothing should be done.

Maybe the 3NF schema is:

E1(ABC), E2(BD) 

Is it correct?

Thanks a lot


So according to @OliverAsmus the 3NF result should be:

E1(ABC), E2(BD) 

But if what I wrote is correct, am I right in thinking that the 3NF (in this particular case) doesn't preserve all the attributes? E doesn't depend upon any key so I got rid of it...

Is that correct? Thanks

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Surely this must be homework? The only normal forms that are of any interest are 6NF, 5NF and BCNF, unless you are an old school academic or are being taught by one ;) –  onedaywhen Jan 24 '12 at 8:59
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1 Answer 1

You're on the right track. Look closely at your 2NF result - this is where the 3NF result will come from. Your next task would be to take the 2NF result and eliminate the fields that do not depend on the key.

There are numerous sources for how and why to do this, but I prefer Microsoft's explanation the best:

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/283878

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According to your preferred article: "Fourth normal form, also called Boyce Codd Normal Form (BCNF), and fifth normal form do exist, but are rarely considered in practical design." Care to comment on these staggering misstatements? –  onedaywhen Jan 25 '12 at 11:59
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