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I'm creating a program which accesses MS SQL Server 2008, the problem is that I can run the program smoothly as an administrator account, even on different subnet computers and using terminal service (mstsc). But the program can not successfully access SQL Server if using another account, even though I've already included the account into SQL permissions, Terminal Service configuration, add the Administrators user group.

On SQL Server Network Configuration - Protocol - TCP/IP is Enabled.

What am I forgetting to do?

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Feb 15 '12 at 3:56

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Need much more detail please. What does "can not successfully access" mean? Do you get an error message? If so, what is it? What is the full error message in the SQL Server error log, including the state? Is your program using Windows authentication or SQL authentication? Have you tried to connect as that user through SSMS or other means? –  Aaron Bertrand Feb 15 '12 at 5:21
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This is not subnets at all, but a mistake in security. We need more info –  gbn Feb 15 '12 at 9:18
    
Also, please post the connection string being used within the program (feel free to obfuscate protected information). –  swasheck Mar 19 '12 at 19:00
    
when you say I've already included the account into SQL permissions, do you mean you added your account to sysadmin role, try this EXEC sp_addsrvrolemember 'Domain\your account', 'sysadmin'; GO –  AmmarR Jun 17 '12 at 20:44

1 Answer 1

If this is installed on a windows 2008 server then you will need to check that the firewall is either disabled (not recommened) or that there is a firewall rule for the SQL port (1433 for default instance, 1434 and whatever is configured for a named instance).

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