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My master to slave replication stopped and is showing this error when I use SHOW SLAVE STATUS;

| Waiting for master to send event | 172.16.10.37 | repl | 3306 | 60 | mysql-bin.000256 | 39420285 | mysqld-relay-bin.000091 | 527772829 | mysql-bin.000246 | Yes | No | asterisk | | | | | | 1032 | Could not execute Delete_rows event on table asterisk.live_channels; Can't find record in 'live_channels', Error_code: 1032; handler error HA_ERR_END_OF_FILE; the event's master log mysql-bin.000246, end_log_pos 652865182 | 0 | 652864948 | 2266665991 | None | | 0 | No | | | | | | NULL | No | 0 | | 1032 | Could not execute Delete_rows event on table asterisk.live_channels; Can't find record in 'live_channels', Error_code: 1032; handler error HA_ERR_END_OF_FILE; the event's master log mysql-bin.000246, end_log_pos 652865182 |

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1 Answer 1

As the message states, the server attempted to delete a row from asterisk.live_channels because there's a replication event telling it that the row was deleted from the master and thus needs to be deleted from the slave... but the row in question does not exist on the slave.

You could identify the data in the row using the mysqlbinlog utility... however, that isn't likely to actually help.

If a slave is configured correctly, started at the correct binary log coordinates, with an identical copy of the data from the master, and the data on the slave is not manipulated by anything other than by replication events (that is, nobody has connected directly to the slave and issued any queries to modify its copy of the data) then this condition should not occur.

But for now, your slave is out of sync, and it is impossible to speculate how significant the discrepancy might be... but the only fix is to get it back in sync, either by setting it up from scratch as if it were a new slave... or by finding and correcting the discrepancies between the slave's current data and what the data on the master would have looked like at the point when replication stopped. The latter option is technically possible, but requires advanced expertise and tools.

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