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I am making a SQLCLR stored procedure in Visual Studio 2012. I have these options for target platform:

SSDT platforms sql server 2005, 2008,. 2012, Azure

Is there not a SQL Server 2008 R2 specific option? Is this because SQL 2008 R2 shares the same compatibility level of 100 with SQL Server 2008?

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I believe it's because there weren't any major changes in terms of SQLCLR from 2008 to 2008 R2. –  Jon Seigel Feb 4 '13 at 14:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A 2008 and 2008R2 user database is schema compatible, hence one version for both in SSDT. In other words, there aren't any schema objects that you could add to a 2008R2 SSDT model that couldn't be created in 2008.

This isn't the same as either database version or database compatibility level.

Database version:

The database version is a number stamped in the boot page of a database that indicates the SQL Server version of the most recent SQL Server instance the database was attached to. The database version number does not equal the SQL Server version.

Database compatibility level:

The database compatibility level determines how certain database behaviors work. For instance, in 90 compatibility, you need to use the OUTER JOIN syntax to do an outer join, whereas in earlier compatibility levels, you can use *= and =*.

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It is not just the compatibility level. Also the .NET options themselves are the same against both 2008 and 2008 R2.

In a word:

Is there not a SQL Server 2008 R2 specific option?

No

Is this because SQL 2008 R2 shares the same compatibility level of 100 with SQL Server 2008?

Not exactly, but it doesn't really matter.

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