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I have a .trc file from a trace that a DBA did on one of my databases. I don't have the SQL profiler tool installed on my PC so I can't view the contents and analyze the trace log. How do I read this file without SQL profiler installed on my PC?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use Clear Trace.

Kevin Kline gives a good summary of ClearTrace : Graphical summary tool gives you clear look into trace/Profiler data

Also if you want a basic profiler, look at ExpressProfiler on codeplex.

ExpressProfiler (aka SqlExpress Profiler) is a simple but good enough replacement for SQL Server Profiler with basic GUI No requirements, no installation. Can be used with both Express and non-Express editions of SQL Server 2005/2008/2008r2/2012 (including LocalDB)

Features

Tracing of basic set of events (Batch/RPC/SP:Stmt Starting/Completed, Audit login/logout - needed events can be selected) and columns (Event Class, Text Data,Login, CPU, Reads, Writes, Duration, SPID, Start/End time) Filter on Duration Copy all/selected event rows to clipboard in form of XML Find in "Text data" column

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1  
Another tool that has been a life saver is RML microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=8161 –  Adam Haines Jul 24 '13 at 21:00
    
@AdamHaines Agreed, but it will steer up a whole new topic of SQL Nexus :-) –  Kin Jul 24 '13 at 21:04

I would probably import the trace to a table, for example:

USE MyDB
GO 
SELECT * INTO MyTraceTable FROM ::fn_trace_gettable('C:\Path\To\My\Trace\MyTrace.trc',    
DEFAULT)

If you don't have permissions to create a table, consider using a temporary table or installing SQL Server Express locally and importing the trace there.

Kin's answer (entered concurrently with mine) might be a better option, but I haven't tried ClearTrace yet.

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Comparing normal profiler and clear trace functionality, in clear trace, you can tell how much CPU, disk reads and writes are done and it shows aggregates as well. I have used it and its a time saver when identifying bottlenecks. This is an online version tracetune.com –  Kin Jul 24 '13 at 19:51

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