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I have 2 identical server with exact disk partitions (OS CENTOS 6.4 both ) [My college central oracle server]. [Oralce 11G Enterprise Edition]

Entire ORACLE HOME ( bin , control files, data files everything on oracle) is on 2nd Disk (which is not a OS disk)

Since OLD server had reached end of life (from HP) a new HP machine with upgraded RAM (OLD system had 16 GIG where as new system as 64 GIG).

Now Since All oracle Dependencies (RPM, libraries, environmental variables, JAVA, Users and groups) are already made on new server.

So Now Question is ..

Can I remove Disk [Oracle HDD] from OLD server and insert it on NEW server and just start Oracle (sqlplus "/ as sysdba" or dbstart and lnsctrl).

Can it will give any challenge. (I have cold backups, export backup, & RMAN backup too).

I just want to give a try on above case.

Will this work ??

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marked as duplicate by a_horse_with_no_name, Phil, swasheck, Marian, Mat Mar 20 at 15:15

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There's at the very least most likely Oracle config that won't be on that disk, such as shared memory configuration and possible OS tweaks. –  Joachim Isaksson Mar 20 at 13:33
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If it's the same Oracle version, then it might work. Since the old system had 16GB, both have to be 64bit so that shouldn't be an issue, either.

NOTE You're going to save a few minutes at the risk of introducing a subtle problem in your production system. So unless your data isn't worth the time to do a proper export/import, I wouldn't do it.

Anyway. Make a backup of the data before trying this. Use the exp tool for this. The counterpart imp is able to import the data into a new databse. Incidentally, this is how you should do it in the first place.

If you don't want to make a backup, I suggest to at least make a raw copy of the old disk.

Some things that can go wrong:

  • Your old hard disk might have a faulty sector which now, you won't notice.
  • There might already be data corruption in your database.
  • Oracle might have saved the CPU ID or similar data somewhere in the database as a means of copy protection.
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Yess!! backups are good.. Also FULL ORALCE is on 2nd Disk so Complete ORACLE (With all configurations & intallation file) Full ORALCE_BASE is at /oracle (which is on Disk 2) So There will be no oracle installation on NEW server, Just place disk and Start ORACLE instance –  Ashish Mar 20 at 13:42
    
what I have done earlier was ORACLE_HOME was on OS Disk where are Control files, archieve logs, datafiles were on other disk, so there on new system new oracle insallation was required.. Probably This is not the case were complete oracle Disk is getting shifted –  Ashish Mar 20 at 13:43
    
I have already have SID, Groups, Limits.conf, sysctly.conf uimit everthing set. I am just thinking of giving a try alteast so that other people can refer this when they have similar scenario –  Ashish Mar 20 at 13:44
    
Thanks & upvote, I will try first this weekend and accept answer and share my views –  Ashish Mar 20 at 13:46
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It worked.. In my case I had volumen groups on Physical HDD, So I gracefully deactivated volumne groups (Ofcourse after Oracle Shutdown) by using 'vgchange -an vgo1' and then 'vgexport vg01' and imported on new server (same IP same Hostname Same Packages Same Path).. Tada.. It worked –  Ashish Mar 27 at 10:35
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