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Are there any tools available to create an executable tsql script from a SQL Server trace file?

Is there an easy manual way?

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Are you talking about the script to create the trace itself? –  Shawn Melton Nov 17 '11 at 15:03
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Profiler does it... –  gbn Nov 17 '11 at 17:50
    
@MrHappy: need the trace definition (what Shawn asked) or about the script to get T-SQL events inside the trace? –  Marian Nov 17 '11 at 20:25
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2 Answers

ClearTrace is a very nice tool that parses current trace files and shows easy aggregated reports on trace files data. But it doesn't script the trace file definition or T-SQL events.

In case you want to script the trace file definition to run it from a job, then you need to go to Profiler -> Filer -> Export -> Script Trace Definition - choose the needed SQL Server version. The result is a script with all the system procedures needed to create the same trace (on a different server or maybe at a later time, provided that you change some parameters like start/stop time, file names..etc).

In case you want to script the events inside the trace file, then you need to go to Profiler -> Filer -> Export -> Extract SQL-Server Events -> Extract T-SQL events. The result is a sql script with all procedures and batches ready to be executed.

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You could use ClearTrace by Bill Graziano (free) which cleans up trace queries and allows you to sort/filter the trace files and still have a readable tsql from the trace.

Courtesy reference of Brent Ozar's presentation on "Using Perfmon and Profiler" at SQL Bits 2010

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