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ADO.NET documentation shows the possibility of setting the transaction level for a SQL transaction to Chaos. It sounds unpleasant, but if the feature is there, presumably it has some legitimate use.

The SET TRANSACTION ISOLATION LEVEL command in BOL (ah! see, I can use google and BOL) nothing seems to be named "chaos" and ADO.NET does have 5 modes that match up nicely to documented levels in addition to "chaos"

What or who is this Chaos level for? (And why does it have an unfriendly name?)

Refs: The ADO.NET enum

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

According to the DB2 documentation, it is a weird isolation level, where changes are committed to the database as soon as you execute them (for others to see).

It doesn't say explicitly, but, there is no roll-back, either, as far as I can tell. Basically, it means no transaction at all. "You say 'transaction', but, I don't really care". Thus -> chaos.

Actually, I found in some e-mail list that "Chaos" actually maps to "*NONE" transaction level in "DB2 for i".

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You can't use it against SQL Server.

It was in DTS:

And is in SSIS:

More references, originally added by Nick Chammas in a comment:

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DB2 has a transaction isolation level called "Chaos":

DB2Connection.ConnectionString property - IBM Knowledge Center

Perhaps it's meant to be used for that. I'm really not sure, but I would assume it means no definable transaction isolation.

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Appears to be for System i only. Do you know what it means? I can't find much info about it, it says no commit so I assume it means that each statement is committed instantly. But this seems orthogonal to isolation level, so there is probably something else – Lennart Aug 8 at 1:19

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