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6

I can only think of three(3) things that can cause a mysqldump to be too large PROBLEM #1 : Disabling Extended Inserts Extended Inserts (--extended-insert) is on by default via the --opt option. If you issue --skip-opt or --skip-extended-insert, every INSERT command will quickly become hundreds or every thousands. Such a mysqldump can still be loaded but ...


4

Is your SQL Server instance existing in your local system (laptop/desktop) or in some other system (server?). If it's on server then go and look for C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL10.MSSQLSERVER\MSSQL\Backup on the server


4

why would the FirstLSN of the second differential backup (22000000041800004) be higher than the FirstLSN of the first differential backup (22000000039800037)? When dealing with Data (Full, file, etc) or differential version of said backups the FirstLSN and LastLSN actually mean something different than is being inferred. FirstLSN when dealing with ...


3

BCP is the tool you're looking for. Here's some links that should put you in the right direction: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms162802.aspx https://www.simple-talk.com/sql/database-administration/working-with-the-bcp-command-line-utility/


3

Chances are that the reason your script runs from the command line but fails from cron is that your DB2 environment is already initialized (i.e. via your .profile) for the interactive session, where it is not when called by cron. Here's a suggested modification: #!/bin/bash # # Setup DB2 Environment . $HOME/sqllib/db2profile # Back up Database db2 ...


3

I want to shrink the 10GB file to a sensible size (maybe 200MB with autogrow 5 MB?). IMHO, 5MB autogrowth is not sensible. You should monitor your log growth using default trace and find a good value for autogrowth. Below script will help you monitor your Log (and Data file) autogrowths. Trend it over a week (or whatever suits your need). This will ...


2

Take a look at my answers to similar questions here, here and here. Basically, it's very simple - a database is a dynamic entity with components on disk, in RAM and in the CPU at the same time. There are all sorts of buffers and caches being filled, emptied and flipping between disk, RAM and CPU. InnoDB is an MVCC engine which allows backup software to ...


1

Yes, as long as you install version 9.1 (minor version doesn't matter). And normally you don't need to copy/move them anywhere, the installation will notice there is already a database system set up and will use it. Of course taking a backup is never a bad idea. Then again, the reason for it being offline should be clear from PostgreSQL logs. Memory ...


1

Since you'd have to apply the differential backup's previous full backup, the end result is identical to if you'd just taken a full backup, made changes, then restored the backup you'd just taken - any changes made would be lost. There are, however, tools and techniques which would allow you to perform partial restores, so you could limit the application of ...


1

There are a lot of factors that could come into play. Size of RAM, whether your software is using any timeouts (e.g.: phpMyAdmin), your own patience. In general, though, I would expect a server that can generate a backup should be able to restore it.


1

AUTO_DB_BACKUP means DB2 will take a backup based on when it feels it should do so. The things that influence the taking of a backup are: Never completed a full backup Time elapsed since the last full backup was a specified number of hours Transaction log space consumed (with archival logging enabled), since the last full backup is a specified size. In ...


1

There are two ways to determine which logs to keep. One you write yourself. You would need to issue a db2 list history backup all for <db name>. This will show you the history file and locate the last backup and the last needed archive log. Anything prior to that can be deleted. Now you can add in automation. First step set db2 update db cfg using ...


1

When you restore an offline backup, you are not required to roll forward (although the database will be in ROLLFORWARD PENDING state at the end of the backup, which you can avoid by using the WITHOUT ROLLING FORWARD option for RESTORE DATABASE). This means that you can remove any archived log files. However, keep in mind that you may want to be careful ...


1

You do not need apply-log for the backup, but you need it for the restore. Depending if you perform differential or incremental backups, you will need to execute one apply-log for rolling forward the backup and application of the changes since the last full or incremental backup. --apply-log --redo-only --incremental-dir Whether you perform that after the ...


1

When it comes to InnoDB, you are right to be concerned. Here is a Pictorial Representation of InnoDB (Made by Percona CTO Vadim Tkachenko) The whole left side of the diagram represents InnoDB's moving parts in memory. The critical piece here is the InnoDB Buffer Pool The InnoDB Buffer Pool holds three things Data Pages : If a page is dirty, it is ...


1

When in doubt ask Tom... backup up and recovery generating extra redo Which is good reason to use RMAN for backups rather than scripted hot backups using begin backup/end backup.



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