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3

Please ask them and also, as max pointed out, test whether such tool can provide point in time recovery. Test various scenarios and see if it matches your RPO and RTO. I am sure its not free of cost only go if it REALLY provides some thing more than what native SQL Server Tsql backup provides. I have not found any tool more reliable than TSQL built in code ...


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First, this assumption is questionable: "Cannot use transaction logs as it would affect my load performance - datasets are potentially huge with large transactions" When you do work in the database, your transactions are logged regardless. Full recovery mode just means your logged work sticks around until the next log backup. If non-logged operations ...


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Please tell me you are not (and not even thinking) of using file system copying on a database server that's up and running? That is virtually guaranteed to lead to corruption of your copies, leaving your backups useless. You won't receive any errors - except, of course, when you try to restore :-( It's not very clear from your post (correct me if I'm ...


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We are also in the process of installing this EMC product at the large insurance company where I work. We are currently using it only for file backups to replace our TSM file backups but will eventually install the SQL Agent. I definitely encourage you to test this in a non-production environment to understand its quirks prior to a production deployment. ...


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Short answer: Just leave the log file as big as it typically needs to be, and stop worrying about it. Longer answer: First, why do you want to keep shrinking the file? If it's just going to grow again (and keep in mind that shrink and grow operations are expensive, especially for the log), then what did you gain? What did you use all that freed up space ...


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A quick 101 on Percona Xtrabackup: Basically, what the tool does is copying the data live in an inconsistent way, but making sure it gets all the necessary changes that are happening at copy time, so it can revert it to a proper state. In other words, it does an "unclean full copy" and then a "controlled crash recovery" with a custom InnoDB instance. That ...


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You can set the database in SINGLE_USER mode. If you also specify ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE it won't wait for open transactions to finish but will just roll them back. ALTER DATABASE [yourdatabase] SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE do your actions ALTER DATABASE [yourdatabase] SET MULTI_USER


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This is just an opinion but could be a consensus... Based on search this is actually a EMC product. However it also states in the guide that it uses VDI devices to backup and restore. I, and others probably, would advise against doing this with production databases. Again this is just a preference for me to stick with native backups. Now since you are ...


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Unless your production database is mission-critical and restore time is of the utmost importance, I would generally suggest that you wait to run the apply-log until you need the backup. Advantages of running apply-log immediately after taking a backup: Your backup is ready for use immediately (with --move-back / --copy-back), saving you precious time in ...


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It is possible to detect such errors using backup checksums. If you use the CHECKSUM option, then yes it should be found but only when using a RESTORE or RESTORE ... WITH VERIFYONLY. If you don't check it, you'll never know. But what do you do when an error is found? That depends on what is wrong and where it happened. The action to be taken first ...


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MySQL Workbench is a client querying and modelling tool and a very good one at that - it's purpose is not to perform server tasks - that's the job of the server. You can perform manual backups using Workbench, but I'm assuming that's not your long term goal. There are many ways you can perform backups. Take a look here for 10 of them. Some of the solutions ...


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Stored Procedures are physically stored in the mysql.proc table as a MyISAM table Simply copy /var/lib/mysql/mysql/proc.frm /var/lib/mysql/mysql/proc.MYD /var/lib/mysql/mysql/proc.MYI If the new installation is the same major version of mysql, copying should do it for you It would be safer to go back to the old setup, start mysql, and dump the stored ...


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Instead of writing your own solution, I would highly recommend to use Ola Hallengren's SQL Server Backup Solution. Refer to : Bad habits to kick : avoiding the schema prefix by Aaron Bertrand. Below should work for you (I have not tested it): CREATE SCHEMA job go CREATE PROC job.BACKUPS @dir varchar(max) AS BEGIN DECLARE @comando nvarchar(max) = ...


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This: psql -U postgres -d utrechtTest > backupTest2.sql runs psql and writes its stdout to backupTest2.sql, which will be overwritten. You meant: psql -U postgres -d utrechtTest < backupTest2.sql which is better written as: psql -U postgres -d utrechtTest -f backupTest2.sql because if you use -f then psql can show line numbers.


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What is the quickest way to restore a DB Enable Instant File Initialization. It will tremendously speed up your restore process. Is there a better way to do this than querying for the processes that are using the DB and killing them? Below code will help you : --- change the db_name as per your databaseName alter database db_name set single_user ...



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