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I will answer you question point wise like you asked No its not necessary that LSN of differential backup would match the LSN of full backup. LSN is basically a stamp of last records that accessed the log. You should have also included DatabaseBackupLSN/checkpointLSN and then you will note that DatabasebackupLSN of differential backup will match the ...


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Please tell me you are not (and not even thinking) of using file system copying on a database server that's up and running? That is virtually guaranteed to lead to corruption of your copies, leaving your backups useless. You won't receive any errors - except, of course, when you try to restore :-( It's not very clear from your post (correct me if I'm ...


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First, this assumption is questionable: "Cannot use transaction logs as it would affect my load performance - datasets are potentially huge with large transactions" When you do work in the database, your transactions are logged regardless. Full recovery mode just means your logged work sticks around until the next log backup. If non-logged operations ...


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You can set the database in SINGLE_USER mode. If you also specify ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE it won't wait for open transactions to finish but will just roll them back. ALTER DATABASE [yourdatabase] SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE do your actions ALTER DATABASE [yourdatabase] SET MULTI_USER


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Yes, it is safe. There is a tool http://www.lenzg.net/mylvmbackup/ that uses LVM snapshots to take backups of MySQL. From InnoDB's standpoint a backup copy taken with LVM snapshots looks like as InnoDB has suddenly crashed. When you start MySQL from the backup copy it will start crash recovery. To save some time it's better to do the crash recovery ...


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Stored Procedures are physically stored in the mysql.proc table as a MyISAM table Simply copy /var/lib/mysql/mysql/proc.frm /var/lib/mysql/mysql/proc.MYD /var/lib/mysql/mysql/proc.MYI If the new installation is the same major version of mysql, copying should do it for you It would be safer to go back to the old setup, start mysql, and dump the stored ...


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For InnoDB and other transactional data stores it should be OK purely from a referential integrity point of view as the normal crash recovery procedure will roll out any incomplete transactions that were in progress when the backup was taken, but there are potential problems that mean it is not recommended that you backup databases this way: Any ...


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Instead of writing your own solution, I would highly recommend to use Ola Hallengren's SQL Server Backup Solution. Refer to : Bad habits to kick : avoiding the schema prefix by Aaron Bertrand. Below should work for you (I have not tested it): CREATE SCHEMA job go CREATE PROC job.BACKUPS @dir varchar(max) AS BEGIN DECLARE @comando nvarchar(max) = ...


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This: psql -U postgres -d utrechtTest > backupTest2.sql runs psql and writes its stdout to backupTest2.sql, which will be overwritten. You meant: psql -U postgres -d utrechtTest < backupTest2.sql which is better written as: psql -U postgres -d utrechtTest -f backupTest2.sql because if you use -f then psql can show line numbers.


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What is the quickest way to restore a DB Enable Instant File Initialization. It will tremendously speed up your restore process. Is there a better way to do this than querying for the processes that are using the DB and killing them? Below code will help you : --- change the db_name as per your databaseName alter database db_name set single_user ...


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MySQL Workbench is a client querying and modelling tool and a very good one at that - it's purpose is not to perform server tasks - that's the job of the server. You can perform manual backups using Workbench, but I'm assuming that's not your long term goal. There are many ways you can perform backups. Take a look here for 10 of them. Some of the solutions ...



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