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5

One alternative here is to calculate the size of active transactions in your transaction log by using DBCC LOGINFO. Your logic would look something like this: CREATE TABLE #vlfs( RecoveryUnitID int , FileID int , FileSize bigint , StartOffset bigint , FSeqNo bigint , [Status] bigint , Parity bigint , CreateLSN ...


4

+1 to @RolandoMySQLDBA of course for another valiant answer. But more to the point of your question: ...will [there] be any reading problem while I copy a MyISAM table files (the .frm, .MYD, MYI) and it gets a [write] transaction. YES. You can't get a consistent backup even for a single MyISAM table unless you do some type of locking to prevent ...


3

I think if you have databases that you know have less (or especially no) activity during certain periods, you should simply back up the log less often during those periods. There is always going to be some log churn and determining whether it was due to user or system activity is going to be a nightmare (and there will almost always be some minute level of ...


3

In some cases, you could face issues copying .MYD and .MYIs because of a major weakness MyISAM has: Data changes (changes to .MYD files) are cached in the OS. (Of course, this would be 100 times worse with MySQL in Windows, so I'll leave Windows out of this answer). If you are using MySQL 5.6, I have a little good news. The command FLUSH TABLES WITH READ ...


3

Creating a database inside a transaction is not possible, so that precludes doing it directly in a trigger, and more generally in any function called by the SQL engine. The usual method to issue script-like operations from a trigger is to have such script running as a daemon and listening to events through the SQL LISTEN command, the events being signalled ...


3

You can't restore a 2008 backup on SQL Server 2005. Simply not possible. You'll need to either: (a) Restore it on 2008, then use Import/Export wizard, Generate Scripts Wizard, Copy Database Wizard, SSIS, 3rd party tools like SQL Compare, etc. to move the structure and data to the 2005 instance, or (b) Upgrade. Developer Edition is $50 or so.


2

There is an obvious problem with your "delayed backup" model, in that your delayed secondaries will reflect the state of each replica set but not the full state of the sharded cluster at a given point in time. A simple example: there is a chunk migration from shard1 => shard2 in progress documents will exist on both shard1 and shard2 while they are being ...


2

Does this failover cluster impose any restrictions on this backup restore or will it be a normal backup restore operation. It will be a normal backup and restore operation (provided there are no other issues with the actual backup and/or restore). The fact that you are going from a standalone instance to a failover cluster instance will not negatively ...


2

Mysql 5.6 introduced FLUSH TABLES FOR EXPORT which might be a better option for your use case if you use InnoDB exclusively (apart from the internal mysql database which is always MyISAM): http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.6/en/flush.html Unfortunately I cannot comment here (yet), but I did quite some research on the answer of Shlomi Noach above. I hope he ...


2

You need to have the SHOW VIEW privilege. I wrote about this Dec 2013 : Which are the minimum privileges required to get a backup of a MySQL database schema? In that post I show these minimum privileges for a mysqldump SELECT SHOW VIEW (If any database has Views) TRIGGER (If any table has one or more triggers) LOCK TABLES (If you use an explicit ...


1

In SQL Server you do not backup the database's files directly. You issue a BACKUP command which creates a new file, usually with a .bak extension. You do not need to stop SQL Server to do this. It is this new file which is moved to tape & off site. To restore you will present this .bak file to a RESTORE command. Here's a previous question on the ...


1

When a database backup is restored it almost immediately allocates the space needed for the database files. So a 300 GB database will quickly appear in the file system at full size, but the file will be essentially empty to start with. Once the space is allocated, the restore process goes on to read the backup file restoring data at the speed sustainable ...


1

You've left out so much that your chances of recovering useful data are negligible. pg_clog contains the commit/rollback logs. Without these, the system doesn't know which parts of the database files are valid and which are not. (gross oversimplification, but hey). pg_xlog, the write-ahead logs. Without these, the database can't handle incomplete writes, ...


1

Kin is correct to point you to Ola Hallengren's backup and maintenance solution. It sounds like you're new, so also consider looking into: SQLServerCentral's Top 6 Myths of Transaction Logs. Paul Randall's Transaction Log blog entries Paul Randall's Backup and Restore blog entries Mandatory: Read A SQL Server DBA myth a day: (30/30) backup myths ...



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