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query_cache_type = 0 query_cache_size = 0 Seriously, turning off the QC is probably best. especially based on what you said. Keep in mind that every INSERT (or UPDATE) to a table causes all entries in the QC to be purged. Furthermore, if the QC size is large, (say, over 50M), the purge time slows down the write. The ENGINE's cache is important to both ...


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MySQL Documentation has SQL_NO_CACHE option: Two query cache-related options may be specified in SELECT statements: SQL_CACHE The query result is cached if it is cacheable and the value of the query_cache_type system variable is ON or DEMAND. SQL_NO_CACHE The server does not use the query cache. It neither checks the query cache ...


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You cannot. MySQL don't have that mechanism. The common featues which are misunderstood about query cache Only works for SELECT queries Queries should be absolutely identical It is not possible to see query cache contents We can only optimize the parameters query_cache_limit = 150K query_cache_size = 512M query_cache_type = 1 Rather, we should ...


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First of all, there are two caches relevant to your query. The Query cache uses SQL_(NO)_CACHE and is the less important cache. For production systems with lots of writes, you may as well turn off the QC. Every write to a table flushes all entries in the QC for the table(s) involved. That leads to another point: A large QC can lead to a lot of flushing ...



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