Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Are strings in table columns represented as bit patterns or Unicode? Computers only deal with 1's and 0's (i.e. binary); datatypes indicate how to interpret that info. Would the queries perform faster if the column in the table was designed to have the year at the left of the name in the strings that are stored? (assuming the year component of the ...


2

Modern_Spanish and Latin1_General both support the same character set. The difference between the two is the treatment of certain characters when sorting/doing comparisons. For example in Modern_Spanish n and ñ are considered different characters (rather than a character and an accented version of the same character). Personally I'd stick with ...


2

While it is true, that the answer to your question is definitely NO, you sort of can achieve a fudge. use tempdb; go create table ct1 ( id int identity(1,10) primary key not null, name nvarchar(4000) collate Albanian_CI_AS); create table ct2 ( id int identity(1,10) primary key not null, name nvarchar(4000) collate French_CI_AS); create table ct3 ( id int ...


4

No, you cannot tell SQL Server to collate different rows differently. Collation applies to the column, database, or instance. Within a query, it is possible that you could apply different collation rules, e.g. for comparisons, using a CASE expression. Assuming you can add a column to indicate what collation should be used for that row. SELECT pk FROM ...


0

You should take a look at my recent answer here to a related question regarding umlauts. Basically, the solution involves a "shadow" or "search" column for proper names. Basically, you use an ON INSERT trigger to populate your search column with the field you wish to search modified for your chosen search method - in this example, case insensitive. The ...


1

You have to change the collation settings either in your queries or in SSAS. There are several different options so the important question is do you use SSAS for other databases than the Croatian_CI_AS one. If so you can pepper all your queries with collate Latin1_General_CI_AS to make sure that you get the data in the Latin1 collation into the cubes. If ...


4

The datcollate column of pg_database stores LC_COLLATE for this database An other page of the documentation about collations says: The collation feature allows specifying the sort order and character classification behavior of data per-column, or even per-operation. This alleviates the restriction that the LC_COLLATE and LC_CTYPE settings of ...


4

You use the collate operator in the join. Such as: select <column list> from dbo.firsttable f join linkedserver.database.dbo.secondtable d on f.name collate database_default = d.name collate database_default Of course, you can also specify a specific collation, such as: SQL_Latin1_General_CP1_CI_AI



Top 50 recent answers are included