Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

I suggest to start with a minimal configuration and then make adjustments For mysql 5.6 i suggest: tmp-table-size = 32M max-heap-table-size = 32M read_rnd_buffer_size = 16M join_buffer_size = 16M sort_buffer_size = 1M innodb-flush-method = O_DIRECT innodb-log-files-in-group ...


-1

Not really an answer, but too big for a comment. This is quite a specialised question and would probably (IMHO) be better off asked on the FreeRadius mailing lists. I looked here and found this FreeRADIUS is a high-performance and highly configurable RADIUS server. It supports many database back-ends such as flat-text files, SQL, LDAP, Perl, Python, ...


1

Update 14:02 You installed mysql-server-core-5.6 which partially failed or partially installed. The -explicit_defaults_for_timestamp is only for MySQL 5.6. Its probable that the partial installation of mysql-server-core-5.6 added this option. I am going to suggest now that you remove any trace of the mysql-server-core-5.6 and reinitalize the data ...


0

I have this line in my.cnf [pol@localhost mysql-5.6.19-linux-x86_64]$ grep expli my.cnf explicit-defaults-for-timestamp = TRUE I think that the my.cnf parameters should use hyphens and not underscores.


0

No, there is no policy for this. You could perhaps figure out a way, e.g. via Group Policy somehow, to set this value to 100... ...but that doesn't really solve the problem, and will affect all environments they connect to, including their local instance(s). You can prevent SELECT * by adding this computed column to the table (or to a view that ...


1

There is no native way to accomplish directly what you are looking for. Why do developers have access to systems they can inherently affect the performance on where it matters? Are these production systems? If so, do these developers need access to prod? If not (non-prod), then why do you care what developers do to development database servers? Maybe ...


0

It is not possible to do that, because once the config is loaded on startup, it is no longer used. MySQL uses a deterministic algorithm for searching for a config file. You can see it on the MySQL Manual (the first table is for Windows). Two things you can do is: check which options are loaded by default: use --print-defaults: mysqld --print-defaults ...


0

In pg_hba.conf, change this line: local all all peer to: local all all password Then you can log in locally using a password.



Top 50 recent answers are included