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OBSERVATION #1 Take a look back at your top output Cpu(s): 84.0%us, 5.1%sy, 0.0%ni, 0.0%id, 0.0%wa, 4.5%hi, 5.0%si, 1.4%st See the last status variable 1.4%st ? What is that ? According to In Linux “top” command what are us, sy, ni, id, wa, hi, si and st (for CPU usage)? st, "steal time", is only relevant in virtualized environments. It ...


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Improving performance is usually not a single stop solution. But looking at your conf and the results of mysql tuner you can do the following Increase innodb_buffer_pool_size by a LOT. That is usually quite critical for InnoDB tables. Further set the following two paramenters in you cnf file for InnoDB sort_buffer_size=2M join_buffer_size=2M You ...


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Looking at a post from the MSDN team, I've come up with a way to reliably get the physical core count from a machine, and use that to determine a good MAXDOP setting. By "good", I mean conservative. That is, my requirement is to use a maximum of 75% of the cores in a NUMA node, or an overall maximum of 8 cores. PowerShell is used to determine the ...


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i have the same problem. I disabled all my third party antiviruses and firewalls and reinstall PostgreSQL again and its now working fine... :)


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The options file in MySQL is a human-readable text file, typically called my.cnf on Unix and my.ini on Windows. This single file contains configuration entries for all things MySQL, including the server, and the client library, and the various other official client utilities. The screen you're referring to is a glorified configuration file editor for that ...


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Ok, after about a billion headaches I finally figured out what was wrong. Here it is: Some tables are MyISAM and some are InnoDB. I didnt know that when I started, which would have totally helped. So, what ended up happening is that when I moved the files to a temp directory, I guess I messed up the InnoDB tables alignment or whatever you call it, anyway the ...



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