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You might have an issue with your credentials. I recently used the following command successfully to back up to SQL Azure: BACKUP DATABASE [MyDatabaseName] TO URL = N'https://mystorageaccount.blob.core.windows.net/mycontainer/MyDatabaseName_backup_2014_12_19_124300_8473463.bak' WITH CREDENTIAL = N'MyCredentialName', NOFORMAT, NOINIT, NAME = ...


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Concurring with Aaron's assessment of ask the developers. I used the wizard to create a full backup plan, exported that to my machine and then opened it up in Visual Studio/BIDS/SSDT-BI. You'll see the Backup Database Task looking something like below When you click that View T-SQL button, it shows the command it will execute. Running a Profiler session, ...


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Since this logic is buried within the code for the SSIS package behind maintenance plans, I think you will only get guesses unless the author happens to swing by here. Here is my educated guess based on a few experiments: For SQL Server 2008 and above, the 7 digits are the sub-second portion of the datetime2(7) output of SELECT SYSDATETIME(); at the ...


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Restoring a full + differential backup restores you to the point in time that the differential backup started. If you just took the differential this second and nothing has happened in the database since it started, then yes, that is the latest state. But it's quite unlikely that you will have a disaster the minute you take a differential backup and that ...


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Irrespective of your BACKUP and RESTORE statements not matching to think you actually restored what you thought your issue is that the Table_1 is apparently in the file group you tried to restore. The syntax for your RESTORE command should include in the WITH clause the command NORECOVERY or RECOVERY. The later tells SQL Server to complete the rollback ...


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You have several questions or issues in your post. Unfortunately, I am unsure that I clear on every issue. I understand that you are no longer using NBU. (Is this Symantec NetBackUp?) -- SQL Server native backup, starting with 2008 R2, supports compressed backups with Standard and Enterprise editions. This will add some load to the CPUs but reduce load on ...


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You should use Percona Toolkit to backup database to prevent from blocking database: sudo innobackupex --user=root --password=rootPASSWORD --host localhost /tmp/ sudo innobackupex --apply-log --use-memory=2G /tmp/$TIMESTAMP/ You need enough disk space in /tmp. Once you finish it, you can copy entire directory to another server. In xtrabackup_binlog_info, ...


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You need to use Percona XtraBackup tool. It works like a charm for huge datasets and doesn't interrupt MySQL operations. http://www.percona.com/doc/percona-xtrabackup/2.2/innobackupex/creating_a_backup_ibk.html There are some tricks but it's worth it.


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No, there isn't a way to separate the two. You'll have to either hang on to the large file, or take a new full backup and start moving forwards from there.


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try the following command this one since the database size is not small: mysqldump -u USER -p --single-transaction --quick --lock-tables=false --all-databases (or) DATABASE | gzip > OUTPUT.gz


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You must use --single-transaction option mysqldump -uroot -p --single-transaction databasename > dump.sql It allows for point-in-time snapshot of data. Once mysqldump starts, all the InnoDB tables will be frozen in time. Suppose you start the mysqldump at 2:30 PM and it finishes at 3:00 PM. All the InnoDB tables dumped will be from 2:30 PM. All other ...


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I found a post by Darren Gosbell, a SQL Server MVP (at the time at least). His post can be found here: http://geekswithblogs.net/darrengosbell/archive/2008/09/13/ssas-verifying-backups.aspx He points out that you cannot run this from your desktop, but you can run it on the server to do the verification. The instructions from 2008 are: Navigate to: ...


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Found it, using this flag: --skip-lock-tables -f The schema still can't be exported correctly, except by using phpmyadmin


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According the error message posted in the comments this is a faulty disk that cannot serve write requests (at a certain location).



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