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8

Trying to normalize addresses is generally a bad idea. There isn't a lot of value to normalizing addresses. Both of your designs are inappropriate for the vast majority of systems. There are two things you typically do with addresses: Use them to send mail or packages to that location. Use them to do geospatial analysis on that location. Since you ...


7

Refer the the Concepts Guide - Overview of Views for this sort of question: Overview of Views A view is a logical representation of one or more tables. In essence, a view is a stored query. [...] Characteristics of Views Unlike a table, a view is not allocated storage space, nor does a view contain data. Rather, a view is defined by a ...


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Redundancy does not mean: Columns that have the same data type Columns (or rows) that have the same data value (if this is coincidental) Columns that are foreign keys that link a child table to its parent (including the same data value as FK and PK in the respective tables) Redundancy is not about columns or rows for that matter. Redundancy is about ...


3

This seems a little outside the scope of a StackExchange question. However..... NoSQL databases are, typically, build to resolve specific issues with the relational model. The most common issue addressed is scalability. Are you planning to need to handle terabytes of data? However, because they're all designed to address different aspects of certain ...


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For something simple like what you have, I would highly recommend Google Docs or one of variants. It's basically a spreadsheet where everyone that you give permissions to can edit at the same time. Everyone can see what everyone else is doing, so there aren't many conflicts. A SQL database would certainly support simultaneous accesses, but I think it's ...


3

It's typically good practice to seperate your OS installation from your database installation to isolate OS disk issues from database disk issues. The primary reason for this is to reduce the change that a problem with the OS could prevent recovery of the database, or vice versa. If your database fills up the free disk space, it can crash both the database ...


3

You have two options OPTION #1 : Create a RAM Disk RAMDISK_SIZE=32g service mysql stop mkdir /var/tmpfs echo "none /var/tmpfs tmpfs defaults,size=${RAMDISK_SIZE} 1 2" >> /etc/fstab mount -t tmpfs -o size=${RAMDISK_SIZE} none /var/tmpfs cp -R /var/lib/mysql/* /var/tmpfs mv /var/lib/mysql /var/lib/mysql_old ln -s /var/tmpfs /var/lib/mysql chown -R ...


2

You can insert a comment marker in the text itself. This marker is not displayed. As text is being changed, the marker stay embedded in the text itself and moves around as text is being edited. If the paragraph is removed then the comment can be orphaned and garbage collected later. Of course, this has nothing to do with DBs, is just pure text processing. ...


2

I think you are looking for DBs that are designed for analytics. May be you should check these solutions:. some data storage solutions specific to realtime analytics Druid Spark Cassandra Hbase hypertable accumulo reference: http://kkovacs.eu/cassandra-vs-mongodb-vs-couchdb-vs-redis http://relistan.com/cassandra-vs-mongo/


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The question is: will it boost the performance of select to split the table into five tables each corresponding to one of the five possible values of z? Yes, you could use partitioning here. Partition elimination will kick in. The partitioning will act as a leading index column. Which brings me to the following point: Just add z as the leading ...


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You can use hstore for use EAV. hstore is available from pgsql 8.4. If you have installed json you can then use function hstore_to_json(hstore) select hstore_to_json('"a key"=>1, b=>t, c=>null, d=>12345, e=>012345, f=>1.234, g=>2.345e+4') this will output: {"a key": "1", "b": "t", "c": null, "d": "12345", "e": "012345", "f": "1.234", ...


2

My preference would be something in the middle. Because states/provinces and countries are well established entities that don't change over time you can pull those out into separate tables. However, trying to normalize street and city-level data whilst relying on human input is error-prone at best, and at worst you'll end up with some very poor information ...


1

MS Access Vs MySQL MS Access works only on Windows whereas MySQL works on almost all platforms. MS Access does not support Partitioning feature whereas MySQL has composite, Range partitioning support. MySQL is opensource so no cost involved. Performance in MySQL is way better than MS Access MS Access database is more suitable for desktop use with a small ...


1

As well as PostgreSQL (which I recommend), you could also look at Firebird (another excellent choice). What is your development environment? If you're replacing spreadsheets, another good option might be Oracle's APEX with Oracle XE. If you do decide to go down the MySQL route, try to avoid non-standard data types like SET and ENUM (porting becomes ...


1

It is not a strange question. I have the same problem every day; how to get things to run faster, faster. We use MS SQL Server 2012 with 512 GB RAM and a SAN at 50TB. We have about ten tables with more than a billion rows, our largest table is 75 billion rows. What really helps is ensuring that the right datatypes are used; no bigints when tinyints will do. ...


1

Optimal table size would be environment specific. I had an almost exact similar environment. A billing/tracking/logging system was generating 2-3GB of data per day and was already at 1.5TB in 1 table alone. An ETL process fed data in so that was the only 'write', while thousands of users 'read' it. It seems like you need to maximize both writes and ...


1

NoSQL and RDBMS are totally different animals. You should pick the one which suits your data and how you intend to record and access it. Don't pick your style of database system on the grounds of performance. Performance can be managed in a range. If HBase isn't performant at your start up volumes, then maybe you'll just have to work harder to tune it, ...


1

The well known players in the database market have cost free editions (usually called Express Edition) of their products available, e.g. Oracle Database Express Edition, SQL Server Express Edition, DB2 Express-C and probably more. They are usually limited on CPU usage, RAM usage and data volume, but provide the features you need just like their costly ...


1

I think you have two that I would recommend: The first is PostgreSQL, which runs on your local computer as a database server. It has an impressive feature set and allows stored procedures to be written in a number of languages (including PL/PGSQL, PL/Perl, and PL/Python). It is free and it is enterprise-grade. PostgreSQL ideas have made their way into ...


1

Sounds on the surface like a graph database problem. If you're going to be walking the edges between users, neo4j or such like may be the one for you. You might be able to do more generic processing using a document db where every user has an _id of user_id and an array of followers _ids. Perhaps you could output to MongoDb, then use Neo4j for creating ...


1

If the two families of data are related then I would generally recommend keeping the in the same database - it makes maintaining integrity easier, for instance taking a reliable and consistent backup is (depending on database engine of course) a single operation. Of course if the two families of data are very loosely coupled anyway this need not be a ...


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What you are looking for is called Optimistic Concurrency Control. Add an int column to your table called version. Start at 0. create table mytable ( id bigserial primary key, whatever text, version int not null default 0 ); Add a row: insert into mytable (whatever) values ('something'); Read a row: select id, whatever, version from mytable ...


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Seems like your x,y is a fixed pair. So you can combine them to form a single key. If all your access is based on a key, then the NoSQL dbs can fit your bill. Some NoSQL dbs offer range queries too but that is not their biggest strength. The limitation with the basic/standard RDBMS systems are that they are monolithic. You need a powerful machine to store ...


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Are the performance gains from data consistency enough of a reason to develop in NoSQL, rather than relational? I think your question presupposes a certain way of looking at things. Your fundamental tradeoff with NoSQL is a tradeoff between declarative ad hoc reporting and fast and loose inputs. This tradeoff is unacceptable for many (maybe most) ...



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