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It'd help more if you could be more specific about what you're modeling, as it's hard to picture at the moment, for me at least. For tree structures, in SQL, any database that supports Recursive Common Table Expressions is a good choice (any major one other than MySQL). For historical data, the History Table pattern has proven to be effective. For table ...


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You can use PostgreSQL's inheritance feature.


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I would say that your second suggestion, haivng a TechSpecID in the Vehicles table, makes the most sense. A way of thinking could be, is a Vehicle implementing a TechSpec or is a TechSpec implementing a Vehicle? I.e. what comes first (the Technical Specification) and what is 'using' your Technical Specifications (the vehicles). But, in the end, it's all down ...


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Imagine that, to withdraw some cash from your account, your bank would require you to run SQL queries against a Postgres database at the ATM. "Computer noobs", as you refer to the users of your application, should not be "logging their data" into CSV files, Google Fusion Tables, SQLLite, Postgres, MonetDB, or any other database directly. Instead, you (or ...


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Generally speaking I would recommend a full fledged relational database. This will give you everything you need, and allow you to grow gracefully. As far as what exact engine to use that depends on personal preference/budgetary constraints/hosting requirements/compatability with the application layer/etc. Personally I would probably use the Microsoft ...


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Your existing index on DATE is obviously useless for the query. The first obvious step for your query: SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE column_a = 'value1' AND column_b = 'value2'; is an index for column_a or column_b (which ever is more selective) or possibly a multicolumn index on (column_a, column_b), like: CREATE INDEX tbl_a_b_idx ON tbl(column_a, column_b); ...



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