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You must pass a locale that matches your desired encoding and is supported by the host as well. For example, if you don't want localised collations etc, you could pass --locale=C. Otherwise you might want --locale=en_US.ISO-8859-1 (or just en_US).


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Show us what you did to (1) use utf8 in the client(s), (2) how you established the charset from client to server, and (3) SHOW CREATE TABLE. If you left out any one of those, that that is likely to be the problem. Do not use utf16, only use utf8. (Unless you have some good argument to the contrary.) If you have INSERTed some data, let's see SELECT col, ...


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Errors occured because of unescaped backshlashes. Values preceeded with \ were inrepereted as ascii signs, but they weren't. To avoid this error backslash - \ should be escaped by additional backslash - \ so occurences of backslashes should be changed to double backslashes - \\ .


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> SELECT hex(CompanyName) FROM Customers WHERE CustomerID = 'BOLID'; 42F36C69646F20436F6D696461732070726570617261646173 This is not valid UTF-8. That database was not created correctly. If you know what the characters are supposed to be, you could manually fix them: UPDATE Customers SET CompanyName = replace(CompanyName, x'F3', 'รณ'); (You'd have to ...



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