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Server1 running SQL Server 2012 with Service Master Key A, db1 with Database Master Key 1, symmetric key and certificate available. I assume that the db1 master key is encrypted with the SMK. This makes everything encrypted by the database master key 'available' to applications, w/o having to explicitly open the database master key. What you need to do ...


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When you restore a database, TRUSTWORTHY is automatically set to OFF. For Service Broker, if you don't use encryption and do use cross-database message transmission, TRUSTWORTHY needs to be set to ON. Try ALTER DATABASE MyDB SET TRUSTWORTHY ON ...for all restored databases involved with Broker.


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SQL Server supports SSL 3.0 and TLS 1.0 only, you must have at least one of them enabled or SQL Server will not be able to start. SQL Server does not support TLS 1.1, 1.2 etc, it specifically uses TLS 1.0. Your options here are to enable SSL 3.0 and/or TLS 1.0, no other way around it I'm afraid. Cheers Mat


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Depending on your security restrictions you could: use cell-level encryption (basically column-level encryption), which decrypts the data once it hits the buffer pool; it's available in all SQL Server versions, including Express encrypt/decrypt data in your own application, so unencrypted data is never present in the database server's memory


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PostgreSQL doesn't currently support DB-level encryption. (Correct as of 9.4, at least). You can use an encrypted file system, though the performance impact can be pretty serious for write-heavy systems, especially those doing random I/O. Your options depend on the operating system - Microsoft BitLocker, Linux's dm-crypt/LUKS/cryptsetup, OS X's FileVault 2, ...


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Yes. Transparent Data Encryption doesn't change any of the internal processing of queries. Database pages are transparently encrypted/decrypted during I/O (i.e. when they are read from or written to disk). In-memory query processing is therefore unaffected, so indexes continue to function exactly as they did without TDE. TDE is designed to negate the need ...


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OK, In case anyone wants to know, I got to the bottom of this. The chain is pretty easy to work out: Create Service Master Key (automatically done upon install) Create Database Master Key (user creates their own key) SymetricEncrypt(Service Key,Database Master Key) -> Store Encrypted Master Key into Master DB Create Certificate ...


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I primarily use them when I'm moving or copying a database to a new instance of SQL Server. In that case, the DMK in the database will be re-encrypted with the new instance's service master key, but the objects encrypted by the DMK (in your case, the symmetric keys) will not be updated accordingly. You'll need to restore the DMK from a separate backup using ...


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You can join on the certificate thumbprint: use master; go select database_name = d.name, dek.encryptor_type, cert_name = c.name from sys.dm_database_encryption_keys dek left join sys.certificates c on dek.encryptor_thumbprint = c.thumbprint inner join sys.databases d on dek.database_id = d.database_id; My sample output: database_name ...


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PostgreSQL comes to my mind. You have pgcrypto library for encrpyting data and there are drivers for .Net


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Microsoft's MSDN blog has a table describing the possible conditions and their outcomes. See Selectively using secure connection to SQL Server to understand client side setting and connection property options impacting secure connections for just the client involved. The server and other clients are not impacted.


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I got a SaaS product and the data is kinda sensitive. I want to give my customers 100% security on the fact that I can't read their data. If it's software as a service, and you do more than simply store blobs of data then give those blobs back when the customer asks, this is pretty much impossible. You're dreaming. You can't realistically combine SaaS ...


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Service Broker uses encryption by default unless you specify that you don't want to use it when sending the messages. At some point the database master key had to be created unless like I said you were specifying that encryption was off when you send the messages (it might be when you create the conversation, I don't remember). Anyway, when you restored ...


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If you are receiving the thumbprint error the certificate was not created properly from the Source Server's Cert/Key backups. I found this question which was already answered with a solution for you: Restore encrypted database to another server


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There is no built-in solution in SQL Server. A symmetric key that was created without specifying the source and identity can never be scripted or copied. That means, in your case you have to decrypt and re-encrypt on the fly while copying the data. You could also create a new key in the current database (specifying source and identity) and decrypt and ...



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