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At least 14 GB. Maybe more if the dump file is compressed. Maybe less if the tables are compressed. A bit more or lot more if there are indexes. Even Data Pump will miscalculate the required space in case of compressed tables. Index data is not stored in the dump file, only index definitions. You can have a 14 GB dump file with 14 GB table data and 0 ...


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Using a combination of MASTER_ONLY and KEEP_MASTER switches, it's possible to get Data Pump import to do the dependency tracking, calculations, and estimations of sizes that it does at the beginning, create the master table that it uses to track everything, and then stop. You can then examine the master table to see how big the various tables are estimated ...


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You can edit the dump file and change the included NLS_LENGTH_SEMANTICS from BYTE to CHAR. Near the beginning of the file you find a line ending like this : ^@02:00:^@^@^D^@BYTE^F^@UNUSED^A^@2^K^INTERPRETED^K^@DISABLE:ALL^@^@ Change BYTE to CHAR using your favorite text editor and save the file. When you will imp that new dump file, all columns will be ...


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A DMP file is just a copy of the whole database contents. During the Import, it does not get modified, so you can use that file to "jump back" to the time when that dump file was created as often as you want.


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There are two possibilities here; the easier one is to use phpMyAdmin to change the name on export. To do that, you'll need to select the "Custom" radio button on the export page, then under the "Output" section look for "Rename exported databases/tables/columns" -- by selecting that checkbox, you get a dialog box to rename the entire database or specific ...



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