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1

Assuming you took a copy of the whole data directory including pg_xlog, pg_clog, global, base, etc, then you can simply ensure that PostgreSQL 9.3 is installed and: postgres -D /path/to/data/directory -c "port=5433" then in another terminal use pg_dump to dump the database(s) from the database running on port 5433 with (eg) pg_dump "dbname=mydb ...


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Use this on Windows (three nested double quotes): exp system/password_for_system@dev file=c:\fooadmin.dmp full=yes imp """sys/password12345@dev as sysdba""" FROMUSER=FOOADMIN TOUSER=FOOADMIN file=c:\fooadmin.dmp In general imp would work as intended with sys account, it is just not recommended. But exp with sys account could possibly produce inconsistent ...


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If you have mixed data, where some are double quoted and others are single, another option would be to load the complete data into a column and have a computed column in the same table that is running a function to strip out the unwanted characters from the source column. something like this: create table [xxxx] ( originalcol varchar(50) null, [$$derived] ...


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To dump a database mysqldump -u root -p databasename > databasename.sql Dumping particular table alone then this would apply mysqldump -u... -p... mydb t1 t2 t3 > mydb_tables.sql


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At the end of the import/export wizard you have the option to save your SSIS package (yes that's what the wizard uses behind the scenes). Save your package to a file then open it in SQL Server Data Tools. Go into the data flow and open the source. In the "Error Output" tab you will see an option to ignore failure (for truncation specifically or errors in ...


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OK, spurred on by RolandoMySQLDBA's comment (I didn't know what to look for earlier), I was able to solve this. Ultimately, I used this blog post to recover the table data from the .frm files. Then, I used the technique here to import the ibd data.


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Set the text delimiter in the flat file reader properties to the double quote.


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Store the running time as an integer in total seconds. For display purposes you can convert the number of seconds into a string in hours:minutes:seconds format or whatever display format you choose.


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The DatePart function will extract a specified part of a date/time field. The following example extracts the hour from the current time. =DatePart("h", Now()) Here is a link with more information on the function.


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What finally solved my problem was: turning archive mode off disallowing connections disabling triggers and constraints truncating all tables performing imports ( attemp of creating existing objects fails but data is inserted ) re-enabling triggers and constraints turning archive mode back on allowing connections back


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Most of the good tips has been given so far, but without lots of explanations for the best ones. I will give more details. First, delaying index creation is a good one, with enough details in other responses. I will not come back on it. A larger InnoDB log file will help you a lot (if you are using MySQL 5.6 as it is not possible to increase it in MySQL ...


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First, you need to know what you are doing to InnoDB when you plow millions of rows into an InnoDB table. Let's take a look at the InnoDB Architecture. In the upper left corner, there is an illustration of the InnoDB Buffer Pool. Notice there is a section of it dedicated to the insert buffer. What does that do ? It is ised to migrate changes to secondary ...


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I wanted to write a comment (as this is not a definitive answer), but it became too long: I am going to give you several broad pieces of advice, and we can go into details for each one, if you want: Reduce durability (you have already done some of it). Latest versions allow even doing it more. You can go as far as disabling the double write buffer,as ...



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