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12

In general, yes. Once you have an application in production, every environment (dev, test, staging, production, etc.) needed to support that application needs to be licensed. As with all licensing advice, however, you need to get it in writing from Oracle Sales. Advice from some guy on the internet holds up about as well as you might expect if there is ...


9

Could you post a link to the forum you're citing, I'd like to read the full context of the post. I am not a lawyer, but legally speaking you don't need a license to use MySQL community edition. They do offer a paid-for enterprise edition. There are some additional tools you get, but I think the big thing people would use that for is support. I've talked to ...


8

Postgres (not Postgre) is absolutely free. You can do anything you want with it. For MySQL you will most probably need a commercial license if you plan to redistribute your application with a bundled database. Not sure if this is required if your application just needs MySQL but I think this also requires a commercial licenses because it is considered a ...


7

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/berkeleydb/downloads/licensing-098979.html Our open source license permits you to use Berkeley DB, Berkeley DB Java Edition or Berkeley DB XML at no charge under the condition that if you use the software in an application you redistribute, the complete source code for your application must be available and freely ...


6

The Oracle Software Investment Guide says the following: Test/Staging - Test/staging environments are used to verify that new or customized code runs properly. This can be staged on separate servers or on the same servers used to run a development or production environment. Any Oracle software used in test/staging environment must be ...


6

Short answer: yes. Slightly longer answer: yes as long as you have one developer license for every person accessing the development and staging servers. From the Licensing Quick Reference Guide: The SQL Server 2012 Developer Edition is a full-function version of the SQL Server software—with all the features and capabilities of the Enterprise ...


5

In general, you can move named user licenses around so long as at any given point in time you can identify the 20 humans (or non-human licensed entities) that have access to the system. In your case, so long as there is never a point where all 40 users have access to the system, it sounds like you would be OK. Of course, as with any licensing question, you ...


5

First of all, the amount of information you've just provided isn't enough to clearly understand what exacly you mean by "using MySQL for one software product". Of course, you're free to use the MySQL Community Edition along with any proprietary, closed-source products you see fit. But as I understand, your company wants to integrate the database server into ...


4

I think the information by MySQL themselves are more reliable than some stuff posted in forums. They provide general legal information and tell you when you can use a free license In short, it is if your application is distributed under a FOSS license. and when you have to buy a commercial one.


4

Anybody can download and install oracle software without any installation codes being necessary. So in effect an Oracle licence is simply an entry in their Licence Management Services (LMS) database. Depending upon what you buy you will get a CSI number. In working with Oracle for more than 15 years this is all I have ever seen at customer sites: a piece of ...


3

Another thing that you could do that was even more economical is to use the developer edition and then run the following query against the database before deploying: SELECT * FROM sys.dm_db_persisted_sku_features This will then tell you if you are using a feature that is not supported in all editions of SQL server, so if this returns no rows, you are ok ...


3

There is certainly an economical way to do this - get an MSDN subscription. The licenses that you get allow you to use the software specifically in development and test environments. It looks like currently $1,199 would cover your needs for SQL Server (and assuming you can make use of some of the other software too), but you could always invest more to get ...


3

From the document, the important paragraph is: To setup a remote mirroring environment, the Oracle data files, executables, binaries and DLLs are replicated to the mirrored storage unit. Solutions like Veritas Volume Replicator, EMC SRDF, Legato Replistor, and EMS StoreEdge are used to mirror the data stored on the disk arrays. Emphasis ...


3

Licensing is "per CPU" or "Server/Cal". Per CPU is for any number of users Server/CAL requires 1 CAL per user. Not concurrent users: any user who will use SQL Server It is all contained here in this MS PDF


3

The 'client only' means that two Express instances cannot communicate directly. They have to have a Standard instance in between acting as a forwarder. Express instances can both generate and consume messages. Messages originating on Express instances can be received on Standard or higher instances. Messages originating on Standard or higher instance can ...


2

Oracle database licenses are quoted per processor, not per machine. They don't care whether you have two machines with two cores each or four machines with one core each. Both equate to 4 licenses you need to purchase. For clustered installations, you need to purchase the appropriate database licenses and the RAC licenses.


2

You can install from the same media on another server without violating licensing; as long as the mirror secondary has equal or less processors than the primary. As long as you don't use it for active read-only connections, it doesn't need a paid license. See page 11[pdf], this is for SQL 2012, but there have been similar provisions as far back as I can ...


2

Go with standard edition, Server/CAL model. The server license is around $1800, each CAL is about $150. Only buy CAL's if you actually need them. Single CPU licence is about $5000. That model would work for you if you have 1 CPU in your server but lots of cores to actually do the work. A CPU is for the actual physical socket (unless the license model ...


2

As licenses go, PostgreSQL's BSD license is about the most permissive license you can find short of just public domain code. You are free to use it in a closed source product and distribute it without having to pay royalties or provide the source code to your product. You don't own anybody anything and you don't have to pay lawyers to look at any edge cases. ...


2

From the downloads page: It is available as both open source and commercial editions. The Community (OSS) Edition is available under the free software/opensource GNU General Public License (commonly known as the "GPL"). If GPL is ok for you, then you're fine. The Carrier Grade Edition is a commercial offering though. You'll need to contact Oracle to ...


1

Basically User CALs are for people, not for Service Accounts. In the User CAL model you need a CAL for each person whether they directly access SQL Server from their account or they access SQL Server through some Service Account. This is a CAL per each and every person that uses the SQL Server, not a CAL per simultaneous user. However, your CALs will allow ...


1

I believe this is going to be closed as off topic because it is a licensing question. In general, Oracle licenses based on processors * cores * core factor multiplier where the core factor multiplier depends on the physical hardware. If we're talking about, say, an Intel-based server (with a multiplier of 0.5 if memory serves) with 8 quad-core chips, that ...


1

I am not a licensing expert but from my understanding licensing for the enterprise edition is based on the physical core on the server for both Microsofts hyper V and VMware. So if you have a dual core you need one licence, for a quad core it's two licences. The only exception is to use oracles virtual box were you assign core affinity between the vm core ...


1

We had a conference call with our Oracle Technology Sales Manager and an Oracle Solution Consultant. We discussed the Double-Take setup and they were able to confirm that based on the way we have our DR site setup and our primary site licensed, we do NOT need to license the DR site. This is of course assuming we do not deviate from the setup we discussed ...



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