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2

It's not possible I'm afraid. This is one of the down sides of using SQL Server logins. The only thing you can do is to look at the Hostname. Most people connect using their local machine and if your company has a list of user to machine name then you can track them that way. Unfortunately this information is not normally logged. You will have to set up ...


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Unlike sysadmin which bypasses checks, the built in database roles aren't so special that they can't be overridden with a DENY. Try looking at Exec sp_helpprotect Null, 'Username' and seeing what DENY records show up.


3

A SQL Server login is used to authenticate the principal at the server level, and to provide server level permissions. A database user maps to zero or one login and is used to provide a security context within the database. Database permissions are assigned to database principals, including roles, not directly to logins. User names are generally not ...


2

I am not quite sure that I understand your question clearly, so please bear with me on the issue of Logins and Users. It appears to be, in your case, SQL Server logins and not Active Directory accounts, but they behave essentially the same within a server and database. Also, for what it is worth, it seems that some step or steps are missing from your ...


3

If I understand your question correctly, the mechanism you are describing is an authentication system. Roughly speaking, this kind of mechanism allows the identification of a certain party (e.g., a person or a machine process) that is attempting to access a determined system. Said party provides a certain set of credentials that are compared with ...



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