Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

100

The position requires a broad spectrum of knowledge ranging from development to system administration and even management. Not only must a DBA know about backup, recovery, internal operations, memory and security, but also how to communicate with both developers and management. A DBA could be giving a high level presentation to management, helping a ...


40

UPDATE 2011-05-25 11:00 EDT In all fairness, to the SysAdmin/DBAs out there, I am adding a fourth category to the Paths of Becoming a DBA. Becoming a DBA actually demands a great measure of experience but it can come from basically only four(4) different paths: Being a Developer and Making a Segue to a DBA Being a Developer and Being Drafted as a DBA ...


32

Database Administration is difficult because of two reasons Slow feedback If one makes a bad decision in the role of a software architect, it usually takes longer to get negative feedback compared to a programmer. The programmer can often become aware of the error during compilation or while running tests, which means that the learning cycle is quite fast. ...


19

It is pretty easy to be a bad DBA Seriously though, a DBA usually has special responsibility for something that is often critical to the success or failure of a business: its data If you run a company then you may well be keen to employ competent experienced people in that role I don't think it is a question of 'easier' or 'harder' - just a question of ...


15

In my opinion, being a Database Administrator is easy...until something breaks that threatens the company and the burden of fixing and restoring whatever it is is on your shoulders. Being a Database Administrator (or Network or System Admin) is a position that requires a certain maturity level. It takes someone who works well under pressure. That's not to ...


14

I know a lot of Database Administrators and they are all over 28-29 years old. Is all database administration like that? Most good, solid programmers I know are also at least 25 years old. I imagine there is a correlating factor to age + experience = good coder. ;) I mean, is this about getting experience more than at least 7-8 years? Or is being a ...


13

pgAdmin and psql, those are the tools I use. A PHP-script isn't very usefull for database management, too slow and many problems with transactions: What to do when something goes wrong? Commit or rollback? This makes tools like phpmyadmin and phpPgAdmin pretty useless, when the script is done, the database connection will be closed. There is nothing to ...


13

There is no easy way to do this. Triggers don't work, as if you select from a table no trigger is fired. The best way that I've found to do this is to have the developers track what they use. When something is going to be dropped check with all the dev teams, and after everyone signs off, rename the object. Then is nothing breaks for a month or to, the ...


8

I wanted to answer to add another aspect not well discussed above: field of vision. There are wide varieties of roles for developers and some (for example, device driver development, or developing operating system schedulers) require a very narrow field of vision and an ability to delve deeply into a small problem and look at it from a purely technical ...


7

I'm rather at the start of my DBA journey, but here are a few of the reasons why people can find this job hard... It's hard because: you have a lot of responsibilities: people can come and go in a company, but for quite a few of them, their most important asset is their data. You're responsible for it and have all powers over it. As the saying goes, with ...


7

There is another path, slightly different form the ones listed. Start as a developer, then become a database designer, then become a DBA. This path was more prevalent about thirty years ago, when databases began overtaking file based applications big time, and people with database expertise were few and far between PS: When I was an ex-programmer turned ...


6

I don't know that anyone has written something along the lines of Ola's script within PowerShell. I know that PowerShell scripts for SQL Server are slowly growing over at the TechnNet Script Center. Then MSSQLTips.com also has started publishing tips working with SQL Server and PowerShell. Then you also have SQL Server PowerShell Extenstions project over on ...


6

Search code for usage with sys.sql_modules.definition: is it referenced? Then... Check permissions: what client code can call it? Then... Profiler Thus: For a table with no reference and no permissions, it isn't being used. With no references and some permissions, run profiler to see usage With no permissions and references, add logging of usage What ...


5

DbVisualiser could fulfill your requirements as it supports quite a number of RDBMS, including JavaDB/Derby. You can see it in action below: The only question mark is if the free version has some limitations which are a stopper for you. You can check the matrix here.


5

One quick way that I have used in the past (and it really depends on the size of tables, number of indexes performance etc), is to add a trigger, that logs a timestamp when an action is performed on the table. As I've said this can have performance issues, so needs to be treated with caution - also watch your logging table doesn't use identity fields, as ...


4

Any application that runs queries against a SQL Server (or any database engine) instance will decrease the performance because it's extra load the server has to deal with. I assume the warning is just to cover themselves, legally. What it comes down to is the scripts you run, and how much activity the application generates on its own. There may be options ...


3

Enough so that existing DBAs aren't overworked and getting burned out; not so many that the DBAs are sitting on their thumbs all day waiting for something to happen. update: as at least one person doesn't appreciate the humor -- It's impossible to use any other metric; one good DBA with some skills in scripting/automation might be able to pull off the ...


3

One way that I've used in the past was to establish a candidates list of tables to remove and then rename them and look for failures. How I established the list was: see which tables are not in use in current stored procedures, triggers and functions empty tables (zero records); non referenced tables (tables that don’t have any relationships); see which ...


2

It really depends on the company. You could have a company of 500 people with two small databases and no in house DBA and be just fine. On the other hand you could be a company with 1000 employees and 2000 very large very busy database servers and need 2-3 dozen database professionals to manage the systems. There is no magic number. It will also depend ...


2

The policy I'm implementing at my company is to put everything that touches SQL Server under source control, in a central location. asp.net projects SSRS projects SSIS projects I even script out all the database objects into a repository of sorts. I don't have it set up yet, but eventually I want to implement some sort of index/central search ...


2

Check out JackDB, it's a database client entirely in your web browser. There's no software to install locally so you can use it on Mac OS X, Linux, and Windows and it works on all major modern browsers (eg. Chrome, Firefox, IE, Safari, and Opera). It supports connecting to PostgreSQL, as well as MySQL, Oracle, and SQL Server databases. At the moment (July ...


2

A capped collection would allow you to maintain a relatively small list, though you would want to have a decent buffer, or be very confident in terms of the size of your documents. The other option would be a TTL collection, but that would be more prone to fragmentation since it will be doing a lot of deletes (this will mean having to deal with said ...


2

I agree with Tom Kyte's 2005+ assessment of this: I actually am a fan of system allocated extents now. It grows the extent allocation size as the table grows. Autoallocate is not going to cause widespread fragmentation. IF you know PRECISELY how big the object is, will be or will grow by -- go ahead, do the math, feel free to use ...


2

As someone who considers himself primarily a SysAdmin and secondly an accidental DBA, I think part of it comes down to the amount of knowledge required to stand on your own and do the job, or perhaps more importantly, to understand the job. The old MCDBA certification sums it up quite well I think. It required four exams to be passed, a SysAdmin exam, a ...


2

I became a dba at the age of 25. It took me 6 months from the time I started studying to get certified and 2 months later I had a job. I think determination definitely plays a major part. For me it was not hard getting the job. All it took was will power to study and showing that I was capable of learning what ever is put in front of me. I will say that all ...


2

A bit too late, but the product Data Utensil aims to be just that. As of now, it supports SQL Server, My SQL, Oracle & Firebird (embedded). Disclosure: I work for Maxotek, who created Data Utensil.


1

Yes, it is possible. The easiest way would be to go with Management Studio to the proper SSAS server, right click on the database -> Script Database as -> Create to -> New query window. That will generate a .XMLA file that creates the complete definition of your SSAS database. That's without the prepared data inside. When you need your database and its ...


1

I'm torn on this one ... yes, the issue is information policy, not necessarily database implementation, which is why I'd prefer this site not be called "Database Administrators", although even for "Database Professionals" it's iffy if it's on topic or not. I can't answer your question directly, other than to say you're probably doing it wrong if you're ...


1

This isn't really an answer to your question, but I think it bears mentioning: this is one reason why all systems outside your database should communicate via views and sprocs. You have the build scripts for these in searchable .sql files, so you can easily see if a particular table or column is being used externally. Of course SSIS will normally connect ...


1

Several years ago, I tried to build a tool to check similar stuff. The TL;DR answer is that I found it not possible to do with the available resources at that time. Where is this column used? This question gets more complicated when you realize that a number of queries, views and stored procedures use select * from the table that column is resident ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible