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17

NOT IN (SELECT ...) and NOT EXISTS (SELECT .. WHERE correlation..) are "Anti Semi Joins". That is, recognised set based operations WHERE NOT (MyColumn = 1) is a filter that requires all rows to be looked at For more info, see: Craig Freedman's "Introduction to Joins" Wikipedia "Relational algebra, Antijoins" Edit: for completeness LEFT JOINs often ...


9

The clustered index IS the table. In the classic phone book analogy where everything is ordered by Lastname, Firstname there's not some other book that the phone book refers to. The Phone book IS the book, and it's in that order. When you have a clustered index, it contains all the data for all the columns in the table, ordered by the key you pick. In the ...


8

Do I need this one at all ? No. The MCSA (and MCSE) are aimed more at administering networks, not SQL Server. These particular 2 are aimed at administering Windows 2003 networks. I think you would be wasting your money taking them as I think these 2 certs will be retiring soon. The Windows 2008 versions use the newer MCTS/MCITP naming convention. In ...


5

The reason it was dropped was because of lack of use. This is confirmed in the MS response to a Customer asking if it could be re-instated. Posted by Microsoft on 1/13/2012 at 1:37 PM English Query feature when introduced in SQL Server was not a popular feature and we didn't find lot of customers using it. So it was eventually removed from the ...


5

Use SSMS to generate scripts for the entire database DDL. Use the script to create a new, empty database. Use BCP to export the data from all tables. Use BCP to import that data into the new database. MAKE SURE YOU BACKUP THE ORIGINAL DATABASE before DROPing it (if you in fact intend to drop it at all). MAKE SURE YOU TEST RESTORE THE BACKUP.


4

(By support I'm assuming that you are talking about software assurance.) SA gets you two basic things. Phone Support Ability to upgrade It also gets you some other stuff. If you have a cluster and you have an Enterprise Agreement then you get something called license mobility which allows you to have a passive node for free. If you aren't clustered ...


4

MS SQL server is a broad topic in itself and to be a master in it, you have to specialize in it. The MS SQL certification levels in order of advancement are MCTS>MCITP>MCM>MCA. There are two tracks of exams: Database Development and Database Administration. Passing the first MCTS exam will get you a MCP status. You can get a MCTS and MCITP in both tracks. ...


3

To make the scripting task alot easier, you can also use 3rd party tools. MSVisualStudio has both a Schema and Data comparison toolset. I personnally prefer RedGate's SQLCompare tool. I also use theses kind of tools all the time to ease DEV->QA->PROD deployments. Once the schema is in place, you do a simple "Data import Wizard" to copy the data over, as ...


3

See this brief article: Microsoft hasn't said much as to why English Query was [discontinued]. One could speculate that it may be due to lack of interest or an inability to provide accurate translations.


2

Many years ago there was s certification called MCDBA. It was really strong certification, with server adinistration and networking adinistration exams inside. Current MCITP certification is easy (I have earned both), and I'm not sure that just finished the courses and just certified MCITP DBAs or DBDs are 100% ready to administer or develop the database. ...


1

On the question of the size of things, first of all you said that you shrank a database, so that would reduce the DB size of the space that was discarded during the shrink. John M also provided some clarification. Regarding the numbers in the bottom picture, they are: select (2585832 / 1024.0) /* KB from the Reserved in the bottom picture to MB */ ...


1

There is another way to rebuild an entire MS SQL database. Step 1: Use script to copy data of all tables from Old to New database. Declare @OldDBName Varchar(200) Declare @NewDBName Varchar(200) Select @OldDBName='OldDB',@NewDBName='NewDB' Select 'Select * into '+@NewDBName+'.'+sc.name+'.'+tbl.Name+ ' From '+@OldDBName+'.'+sc.name+'.'+tbl.Name ...


1

It's the same risk/reward trade-off as with any insurance policy. If your applications and their database are not expected to evolve, and you have a robust backup and recovery procedure, the risk of not having the vendor support is relatively low. I know companies that have been running unsupported Oracle instances since late 1990s. However, any change to ...



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