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pg_basebackup is not the right approach. It won't work, because the 32-bit and 64-bit data directories are not compatible. You will have to dump and reload using pg_dump and pg_restore, plus a pg_dumpall --globals-only restored via psql for user accounts etc.


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Sounds like the data you're exporting isn't utf-8 encoded, or is being chopped up / mangled in transit. This: Ã9ÃýÃ0Ã looks like what happens when you decode utf-8 as iso-8859-15, cp1252, or related 1-byte encodings. But it's not valid utf-8 when demangled. Perhaps you've cut it part way through a string, rather than copying from the beginning of the value? ...


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Tring ESF Database Migration Toolkit, you can use it to move data from Oracle to SQL Server or back without any scripts.


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Is hard to say which method is faster, but I would say from my experience use source backup is faster than import. It seems the issue you see with the file header when you use the source files comes from the file format of AIX which is big endian, while on Linux is small endian. The files need to be converted. This can be done using RMAN: e.g. RMAN> convert ...


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Sounds like a data pump using a network link would do the job. It's always preferable to run it during quieter hours but if your source database is not under powered then you might be able to run it during regular hours without your user's noticing any difference in performance. From the article create a database link from the destination to the source ...


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I found out what the problem is, in my XE 10 additional tablespaces were created. When the import into 11 discovers those tablespaces do not exist yet, it tries to recreate them with the statement with which they were created in the first place, in XE 10. That explains where the wrong paths are coming from. I just copy & pasted the create statements ...


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You can verify that no migrations are running by checking the balance with sh.isBalancerRunning() which is true if chunks are being migrated and false if not. Using BalancerState only shows you if it is enabled or disabled, not its current run state. While it depends on what the specific documentation says, I'd probably feel safer setting the balancer ...


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No. In fact you can't restore the system databases from a SQL Server 2000 system to a SQL Server 2008 instance. If you did parts of (or the entire) database engine won't work as the SQL Server 2000 system databases are formatted very differently from SQL Server 2008.


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Relying on the service to shut down gracefully and detach your database files cleanly is risky. I have often seen this result in corrupted files that can not be used elsewhere, and which fail to start up even when starting back up the source instance which corrupted them. Moving the files after detaching them poses a similar risk - if they get damaged in or ...


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MySQL Workbench is primarily a tool to work with the MySQL database server and hence all implemented migrations ultimatively use MySQL as target. No other target is supported.


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MySQL Workbench doesn't have that capability. However, migrating away from MySQL is probably one of the easiest RDBMSs migrations possible. Migrating data is easy- just export in CSV format and import to the desired target, or use ODBC as a compatibility layer. The complicated thing is something common to any migration- porting the schema, server-side ...


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I you can't or don't want to make "native" binary backups than mydumper is a good alternative. dumping a loading is much faster than regular mysqldump backups.


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The best way to migrate tables between servers is to do it in binary "native" format. Doing a serial logical dump (as mysqldump does) not only may take days on a very large database, but it will take even more for recovery. If you need to maintain availability on the source server for InnoDB tables, the best way is using an utility like MySQL Enterprise ...


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You can use ssh to securely forward the MySQL port remotely. For example, if you execute: ssh -L 3307:localhost:3306 <ssh-user>@<remote-server> You will be able to connect to the local port 3307 as if MySQL was running there. All connection information will be tunneled though ssh, so it will be sent securely. That way you can connect using ...



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