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The problem explained As per your comment, your shard key is the _id field of the document. This field is monotonically increasing, basically like an incremented integer. Put simply, sharding works this way: documents are stored in chunks. Those chunks are spread over the cluster based on ranges of the shard key. Let's look at a simple example: s1: ...


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The first thing to look at is db.serverStatus().ft. This has a bunch of metrics that may be helpful, to figure out where you're spending time. These are documented here: http://docs.tokutek.com/tokumx/tokumx-server-status.html Usually the way to improve query time is to make sure you have the right index for your query. You might be doing a query on ...


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You can find these programs using the Linux find command as such: find / -name 'program_name' -print 2> /dev/null Where 'program_name' is for example, bsondump. find / -name 'bsondump' -print 2> /dev/null The 2> /dev/null prevents find from printing all the paths it looks at.


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Lot to go through here, so I'll take it piece by piece, first off splitting: I thought this meant that when a chunk hits 64mb, it splits into two equal chunks both of size 32mb. That's what is demonstrated here. Is that not correct? That's not quite how it works. If you have a 64MB chunk and you manually run a splitFind command, you will get (by ...


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If you have the PEMKeyfile and CAFile set up correctly (per the docs) then the remaining piece of the puzzle is to run with requireSSL sslMode to make sure that you will only accept SSL connections for your databases (there are other modes to allow for mixing encrypted and non-encrypted clients, but that is only really recommended for upgrading from ...


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There is no need in having 2 arbiters. The minimum recommended replica set consists of THREE servers and is: a primary a secondary an arbiter the arbiter can be on either machines, but it is recommended to be on a separate machine (VM or anything) so that it won't go down with one of the servers if something goes wrong. You could use multiple arbiters ...


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The page faults metric for MongoDB on Windows essentially contains hard (actually hitting disk) and soft (reallocating a pointer in memory) page faults. If you run the same experiment on Linux, the page fault metric only reports hard page faults and you will see the behavior you expect. This is a known issue with the Windows version and the relevant issue ...


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Basically you have a few misunderstandings here, the first being that the balancer is a load balancer. It is not - it simply looks to address imbalances in chunk counts on your shards. That can have the side effect of balancing your traffic out as it moves chunks around, but strictly speaking it is not a load balancer. It also does not run continuously, ...



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