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This type of structure is termed a Sub-Type relationship and is usually built in an RDBMS thus (using SQL Server T_SQL syntax): create type B as table ( StringValue varchar(max) not null, IntValue int not null, FloatValue float not null ); create table ThingTypes ( ThingCode varchar(6) not null ...


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Normally you should never do so because other revisions may be deleted after compacting the database. You should include all necessary fields to recompose(reprint) the invoice in the invoice document, like: product description, product price, total, and so on. This is the same if you would store invoices in a rdbms.


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As usual in similar cases, I would strongly recommend that you look at Open Source solutions - well before the design phase. EVEN if you are doing something truly radical, one can always learn by standing on the shoulders of giants. I have worked as a student on the OpenEHR project, so this interests me. It's been a while, but I would start by looking here, ...


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Option 4: Class Table Inheritance This is a design technique used to implement a class/subclass situation. In this situation, attributes often apply only to one subclass, and not to all rows in the table. Visit the tag of the same name over in SO to see a bunch of relevant questions and answers. This has the advantage eliminating NULLS (mostly), ...


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Ok, I found the solution, I have to use the reduce function for that, like: function(keys, values, rereduce){ var result = null; var orders = [] for(var i =0; i< values.length; i++){ if(values[i].type=='customer') result = values[i]; else{ orders.push(values[i]) } } result.orders = orders; return result; }


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In general, clustered-NoSQL databases offer you better horizontal scalability. So, as you scale you can get higher capacity (both memory & compute power) by simply adding new nodes. So, it will be a good insurance for the future. When it comes to ACID properties, NoSQL databases offer flexibility. So, it boils down to how much ACIDness you want and how ...


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There's two parts to this question: Where should the data be persisted permanently? Let's hold off on that part until we answer the second one, which is much more important: Where should the clients query to check for vulnerabilities? A caching layer. Your clients should never hit the underlying data store first. There's not a need for atomic ...


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Your use case looks like a simple key-value lookup, where the key is the website and the value part will say if the website is black/whitelisted. Also, you may not need the typical RDBMS functionalities like joins etc. I think a NoSQL solution is a better fit for you. Why have the baggage when you dont need it.


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The volume of queries that a system can handle depends on more than just the database management system you use. SQL / NoSQL systems will both require a solid hardware foundation to handle high volumes. If you are more concerned with masssive throughput and being able to store unstructured data I would lean towards NoSQL. If you are more concerned with ...


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It's really too early to tell from what you've described - not enough detailled information. There are those who say (probably correctly) that NoSQL systems can update rapidly - even more rapidly than RDBMS technology. However, that speed comes at a price (no SQL/poor indexing) - this is the ONE thing that people should realise about NoSQL. It does have ...



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