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5

If I keep data for 6 days per month, instead of 1 day per month, will my queries perform slower? It depends. No - if you run exactly the same queries as before (no access to the new data at all). SQL Server's partitioning implementation creates a separate rowset for each partition, so when you create a partitioned index, it creates a separate b-tree ...


2

If I keep data for 6 days per month, instead of 1 day per month, will my queries perform slower? Wrong question. Yes, they will be slower - the index is deeper, more data must be accessed to filter. But the real question is: Will it be significantly or at least noticeable slower - and that is likely a no, because the index depth growth is NOT linear ...


0

We ended up coming up with a solution for this. Basically, we had to manage the partition creation for both the publisher and subscriber databases/tables when we made a change. We were loading data using SSIS and there were mechanics that were built in to create new partitions on the publisher, so we implemented the same logic to do the work on the ...


2

I suspect the advice is predicated on the likely utility of partitioning a dimension table. In a data warehouse, fact tables are good example of the adage, big data is medium data, plus time. Dimension tables don't have time (not really), and as a rule don't have useful partitioning properties. Yours seems like a good example. Why is Accounts ...


4

Why would you expect performance to be different with partitioning? Partitioning improves manageability but performance depends greatly on the workload and queries. For example, if you have a useful index on the DateColumn, you will likely get the same performance with and without partitioning. With no index on the column, performance may be better with ...


1

The short answer is no, MySQL does not have that 'feature'. The long answer (and opinion)... Perhaps 1% of tables are partitioned. Perhaps 1% of partitioned tables could use that feature. Now imagine the effort to implement, test, and deploy such an obscure feature. Oracle has had several decades to incorporate little-used features like that. MySQL is ...


1

Partitions can be rebuilt individually. This allows you to interrupt the rebuild and preserve the work already done. The rebuild can be resumed later after the previously completed partition number. Below is an example of this technique, where the @PartitonNumber value can be changed in a restart scenario. DECLARE @PartitionNumber int = 1 --specify ...


0

have_partitioning variable is removed from MySQL version is 5.6.29. That's why it is not showing.Instead of it you can use show plugins for knowing partition is enabled or not.If status value is Active then it is enabled.You can also disable partition by adding skip-partition=True while starting mysql server.



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