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The entire folder should be owned by mysql cd /usr/local/mysql-5.6.21-osx10.8-x86_64/data/ chown -R mysql:mysql * Then go restart mysql Give it a Try !!!


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In Vedran's code which you reference, he also signs the stored procedure in the other database. I do not see in your code that you have taken that final step. Erland Sommarskog has an extensive discussion at http://www.sommarskog.se/grantperm.html of this problem. This includes a discussion of, in his words, "the Problematic EXECUTE AS". In the following ...


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If your server is in a domain, you must select the computer name location or NT SERVICE\MSSQL$SQLEXPRESS will not be found when adding the user to security rights


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Ownership chaining from procedure does not work with DDL statements and TRUNCATE statement. You can use execute with impersonation (execute as) in your case. The impersonation example for creating a stored procedure is - Create procedure <your procedure> with execute as owner as create type ... Alternately, you can sign your procedure with ...


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Here is our solution (believe me it will work perfectly!) After investigating the procedure about how the execution reports are stored, we found that every time a job runs, the internal.executions table in SSISDB will be updated. And in order to view the execution report of this run, we need to run something like below: EXEC SSISDB.catalog.grant_permission ...


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With the caveat that I'm not a security person... There is no predefined database role other than ssis_admin that is special to the SSISDB. That allows one to do all the SSIS things but that's clearly more power than a support person should have. There are two schemas, internal and catalog. Catalog is meant for us, end users to interact with the SSISDB ...


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This example shows that your database users can run queries and collect the execution plans within a database where they have been granted SHOWPLAN (and without being added to the db_owner role), as long as the server-level login has not been explicitly denied the ability to ALTER TRACE. It also shows that unless you explicitly grant any trace-related ...


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You also need to verify that the AD account will have access to the parts of the file system that it might need. We ran into this awhile ago, and I don't remember which jib had an issue. Could have been backup, or something else. If you're using SQL to connect to remote SQL Servers, then it depends on if you are using linked servers. Linked servers use ...


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If you have any jobs that are running SSIS packages that are accessing other servers, make sure your new account has the appropriate permissions on those servers. For example, if SQL Server A has an SSIS package that is pulling data from a database on SQL Server B, you'll need to make sure that your new account has access to SQL Server B and permissions ...


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There is no way to grant backup but restrict to certain options. Stop giving them permissions to backup databases. Create a stored procedure that executes as owner and backs up the database with copy_only, and give these users exec rights on the stored procedure. If you need this for multiple databases you can create multiple procedures or you can use ...


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You could create a simple audit report which shows who is doing the non-COPY_ONLY backups, eg select user_name, min(backup_start_date) min_backup_start_date, max(backup_start_date) max_backup_start_date, count(*) records from msdb.dbo.backupset where is_copy_only = 0 group by user_name


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No there is no option or restriction which we can enforce so that a user can take copy_only backup when ever he tries to take any backup but what you can do is create a procedure which backups database with copy only option and grant execute on the procedure to various users and then remove backup database privilege from the user. BACKUP DATABASE and BACKUP ...


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You cannot revoke privileges that are not granted. The table (not database) owner implicitly has full rights on the table. They cannot be revoked, except by changing the owner of the table. What you probably want to do is connect with a user other than the owner of the database/tables, and GRANT that user only the rights it should have over the table(s).


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You should enable trace flag 1802 on your database servers. This will allow SQL Server to retain inheritable permissions when you detach a database so you won't experience this issue going forward: http://support2.microsoft.com/kb/922804 DBCC TRACEON(1802, -1) Add it to the startup parameters of the SQL Server service ...


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I thought that ALTER AUTHORIZATION might offer a way to transfer ownership, but no, according to the docs (emphasis mine): Ownership of the following entities cannot be transferred: <many things> and event notifications. So, script them, drop them, and re-create them under a more generic account that is not tied to an employee. This is similar ...


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In our company we maintain read-only slaves of production databases that are not relied on by production services. We grant developers access to those for access to production data. If there is sensitive data (Customer Info, payment info, Etc.) we restrict replication of those tables and maintain a sample data table on the slave server.


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I created a series of stored procedures that accomplished a similar goal (with some powershell for flavor) based on this article Claire-Hsu - SQL Logins I don't have a blog of my own (I know, I know) so I can't share my precise solution with you. I essentially created three stored procedures. One for the server logins, one for database and another for ...


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You've given 'user' the readAnyDatabase permission. This means it has read access for every database in the cluster. Change the permission to readOnly so user will have read permission on admin DB only.



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