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My fault - I was convinced that changing the schema owner was also changing the ownership of all tables. But not. solved changing the creation script, so now ownership is given at creation


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It was seriously LOL. I gave NetworkService user full control to mailroot folder residing in C:\inetpub\ and Vola email was sent from localsmtp. I bet if someone has faced this problem and has find any solution like same. Reason OF Solution - login context/User that is rendering report on ReportServer and creating an email template to throw it in pickup ...


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You'll need to deny permissions on the master database Add a new role DenyExecRole on master DB Add the desire login to that role Deny execute permissions: USE master; DENY EXECUTE TO DenyExecRole; GO


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I believe it should be something like: USE <database name>; DENY EXECUTE ON OBJECT::<object name> TO user name; GO OR DENY EXECUTE TO <user name> Alternatively you can create a DATABASE role and assign Table rights to this role then attach role to user: Create a new Database Role named appropriately. USE ...


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No you can't. SSH is an operating system for remote administration, what is happening when you do ssh and directly enter to the database is because of a script or default shell changed in /etc/passwd for the specific user. But for mariadb(mysql) (including workbench) this means nothing, cause in practice is very likely to do ssh root@yourserver and then ...


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By design it is not possible to change this behavior through SQL Server Management Studio (SSMS). There are documents from Microsoft (here and here) that “clearly” explain this behavior. While the articles are related to MSSQL 2008 is still true for MSSQL 2005/2012 (needs to verify for 2014): “File access permissions are set during a number of database ...


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The only permissions you granted that user are create table and alter schema. Unless you specifically grant the permissions you want that user to have, they won't have it. Or you could grant a role.


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Granting schema modification is not, and should not be, the same as granting DML rights. Grant the user the exact rights that user needs, including 'SELECT', etc, as necessary. See https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms178569.aspx for details.


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I ended up using a post-initialization script to grant this permission at the subscriber and it worked great.


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Starting an Agent job from a user database is common, and the best way to accomplish it is to use code signing. Books Online describes the concept here [http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188304.aspx]. In your application database: Create a certificate Use ADD SIGNATURE to sign the stored procedure you wish to call sp_start_job Use ALTER ...


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Run the output of the following query: SELECT CONCAT("GRANT SELECT ON ",SCHEMA_NAME,".* TO 'test_user'@'localhost';") FROM information_schema.SCHEMATA WHERE SCHEMA_NAME NOT LIKE 'mysql';


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Since you have 200 databases and you do not want to grant one by one. Fastest way to do that would be GRANT SELECT ON *.* TO 'test_user'@'localhost'; FLUSH PRIVILEGES; And then just revoke the privilege in mysql db REVOKE SELECT ON mysql.* FROM 'test_user'@'localhost' ; FLUSH PRIVILEGES; But when I selectively GRANT and then REVOKE on mysql.* . Then it ...


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Specify the owner in GET_DDL, or use ALL_MVIEWS instead of USER_MVIEWS: select dbms_metadata.get_ddl('MATERIALIZED_VIEW', 'MVIEW_NAME', 'OWNER') from dual; select query from all_mviews where mview_name = 'your materialized view';



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