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14

You won't get a true picture of memory usage from Task Manager if the account the service is running under has the lock pages in memory privilege (edit: as per Mark Rasmussen's comment/link). To determine how much memory is being used you can look at: SQLServer:Memory Manager\Total Server Memory perfmon counter DMVs I can't recall if there is a DMV or ...


13

In a VS environment, I've always used database projects to implement the update scripts. I tend to use unimaginative names like "DatabaseUpdate17.sql" or "PriceUpdateFebruary2010.sql" for my scripts. Having them as database projects lets me tie them to Team Server tasks, bugs (and if we did code reviews, to them as well). I also include in each database ...


7

There's a recent article from our own Brent Ozar that treats this case, when Task Manager doesn't show correctly the memory eaten by SQLServer and its additional services. You can find it here: A Sysadmin’s Guide to Microsoft SQL Server Memory. Quote: "Why Isn’t SQLServer.exe Using Much Memory? When you remote desktop into a server and look at Task ...


5

The reason the kill takes so long is most likely due to the rollbacks issued by the innodb transaction. From InnoDB performance tips: Beware of big rollbacks of mass inserts: InnoDB uses the insert buffer to save disk I/O in inserts, but no such mechanism is used in a corresponding rollback. A disk-bound rollback can take 30 times as long to perform as ...


5

an user process is a piece of software that can connect to an oracle server. You (the user) can start a piece of this kind of software, then connect to oracle. Not quite. A User Process in Oracle is different than a client, which is what I think you are referring to. The user starts a client program (SQL*Plus, Pro*C, etc.), which runs on the ...


5

Sometimes a SPID can choke for some out of process calls. xp_sendmail (the old way) sp_OA% sp_xmlpreparedocument etc You need to stop SQL Server or even reboot the server Or more likely you could be rolling back a huge UPDATE or such: wait or restart, up to you... Edit: Aaron's comment of changing a DB status may work as well as an intermediate step.


2

This section of documentation uses the term “User Processes” to refer to the client processes that connect to an Oracle database. If you read down the page further it describes the two types of processes that run the Oracle database server code – Server Processes and Background processes. Like DCookie I have heard Server Processes referred to as User ...


2

Another solution is to use something like PowerDesigner, ERWin, etc to design and manage changes to your database. We're starting to transition to a policy where databases are modeled in PowerDesigner. All changes to the database structure/code is done in the model, checked into source control and then change scripts are generated from the models to ...


2

If installing the initscript and using the standard sudo service mysql start | stop aren't on the list of things you consider reasonable options, you could always compile your own version of mysqld with some custom hackery to the signal handling code in sql/mysqld.cc where it looks like some signals aren't defined yet, so presumably no-ops just waiting for ...


1

You said .. no control over the stored procedures .. low volume server, e.g. not too many of these batches will be running simultaneously. Therefore, I'd do nothing. Hints should only be added very judiciously when required. As it stands, you have no known issue to solve. If you still want to add a hint, then simply use ROWLOCK to disallow table ...


1

I can see a messy operation in this. The tmpTbl is InnoDB. Loading new data into it will produce some MVCC activity. This will pile changes in the redo logs (housed in ib_logfile0 and ib_logfile1, perhaps some will be in ibdata1 as well). Once you kill the INSERT, all the changes (for each row, a new record in place of no record) to the InnoDB table must be ...


1

I know it sounds overkill to most DBAs: Have you considered using Ruby on Rails to track the Database changes (and only the DB changes). You don't need to run any app or write any ruby code etc. But I found the style of migrations (that's how they call it) is quite useful: http://guides.rubyonrails.org/migrations.html Sql Server is also supported, you ...



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