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4

I posted this in the comments section but I feel this should give you an answer that is simpler and cleaner. https://paulbrewer.wordpress.com/sp_restoregene/ Simply install the script and run sp_Restoregene. You can pass it @database and @stopat too. This script will script all the restore scripts automagically for you. Including FULLs, DIFFs and LOGs ...


3

TailLog backup contains the transaction log that was generated after the last log backup.so this is necessary if you want to restore to latest point in time.When we try to restore the database which is online and whose tail log has not been backed up ,SQL Server will throw the error you are getting To avoid this error use NoRecovery. But with above ...


2

No ! But, you can : 1 script our your database schema and use BCP out and bcp in method or 2 restore the database as a copy on EE or Dev edition, remove all enterprise features and backup the database and restore it on standard edition.


2

I think this query may help you. I took it from this link. SELECT physical_device_name, backup_start_date, backup_finish_date, backup_size/1024.0 AS BackupSizeKB FROM msdb.dbo.backupset b JOIN msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily m ON b.media_set_id = m.media_set_id WHERE database_name = 'YourDB' ORDER BY ...


2

I suspected multiple backups might exist in this backup file. If you run: RESTORE HEADERONLY from disk = [tempfile] this will show all the backups that are in the file. You are not restoring the latest backup, use FILE=X to restore the appropriate backup.


1

I agree with Chad Mattox's answer. But to simplify the process, I'd recommend you to use the following t-sql to do the backup BACKUP DATABASE LiveDB TO DISK = '[tempfile]' WITH COPY_ONLY, INIT; By adding INIT in your backup script, you will always overwrite the existing one and thus simplify your restore script (by no need to find the latest File [X])


1

ApexSQL Restore will mount the backup as virtual Database, and you can query it using SSMS. I also published a PowerShell script that will let you analyze your backups in a given folder. I wrote it for analyzing size but you could easily adjust this to include properties like the date taken and such to find which backup you need to mount. You can find the ...


1

Yes, it can be a good idea. In fact, allowing this was a major feature in the release of PostgreSQL 9.2.



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