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4

No, the option is there for you so that you can decide to either: Kick all users out right now and restore immediately; or, let the restore operation wait until it can get exclusive access to the database before it begins. You can't restore and keep connections active, sorry. This is like changing the keg without interrupting someone actively pouring a ...


0

The database has log and data files that are stored on the file system. If the sys admin has a process of regularly backing up the location where the database files are stored then you might be able to get some of the data back. Assuming that you can get these files from before you overwrote them - then create a new database and attach the db and log file to ...


0

it seems like your only option is a super long shot hail mary. WITH REPLACE replaces the old DB but I'm not sure if it explicitly searches for those DB pages on disk and tries to overwrite the pages even if the DB is different. If the data is only 'marked' for deletion from the OS then you can have a very expensive data recovery center look at it. ...


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Look to see if the data is stored somewhere else. Perhaps the system sends email confirmations. If so, retrieve the emails (from sent items or from auditing on the email system) and hire some temps to retype the information. Perhaps the system prints out reports. If so, obtain the printouts and get the temps typing. Perhaps the system exports data and ...


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I would like to inquire if there is an possible way to return lost data that stored in a Sql server Database after making a wrong database restore? No. There is NO way to get the data back. You might have used RESTORE .. with REPLACE which REPLACES the data in the database with the data from the backup that you just restored. So there is no way. You ...


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No backup, its almost a zero chance of recovering the original data: Only thing can help if you have anyone of these like snaphsot, ,mirroring, LOGshipping or replication enabled for that database. Have not heard, a roll back without proper backups!


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Assuming your full backups are always done WITH INIT: SELECT TOP (1) @disk = f.physical_device_name FROM msdb.dbo.backupmediafamily AS f INNER JOIN msdb.dbo.backupset AS s ON f.media_set_id = s.media_set_id WHERE s.database_name = @db AND s.[type] = N'D' ORDER BY backup_finish_date;


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Its not easy because SQL Server does not allow you to do partial restores (by filegroup maybe but...) You have to do a full restore to another name or instance and insert the old rows (from the restored database) to the existing table without overwriting existing records.


-1

If somebody came to this question when looking for answer to failed attempt to restore SQL Server database to localdb (like I did) then it might be localdb limitation. I used SQL Server Express and was able to do a restore.


2

Look at percent_complete and estimated_completion_time in sys.dm_exec_requests. If it is in fact populated for restoring logs (I have only tested full database restores), it is going to be based on the same math you want to try and calculate manually. SELECT percent_complete, estimated_completion_time FROM sys.dm_exec_requests WHERE session_id = ...


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Simple way to query the end time: use MSDB go select * from restorehistory; Or use MSDB go SELECT MAX(restore_date) as LAST_RESTORE_DT FROM restorehistory WHERE destination_database_name = 'DB_NAME' The restorehistory table doesn't have the start time of the refresh.


2

1.The restore history information is readily available inside the msdb i.e. msdb.dbo.restorehistory You can use below T-SQL code to find the start time and restore information of a database over a required period. DECLARE @dbname sysname, @days int SET @dbname = NULL --substitute for whatever database name you want SET @days = -1 --previous number of days, ...


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SQL Server does not store the start and end times of a restore like it does for a backup (in the backupset table). The best you can do is to either A) create a log table that you insert into when you start a restore and then update when done or B) you could use the default trace in SQL Server. If you have not changed any of the settings and it's still ...


1

If you are using innodb tables, try to raise innodb_buffer_pool_size as much as you can. You must balance the ram from mysql and other tools you use for development. The idea is to don't have a swapping machine and to use memory resource as best as possible.



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