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According to the link to a Heroku discussion here: Howto: Restore a single table to an existing database, the way your're doing it is always a destructive action. A better solution proposed is to dump the table locally, and import the data remotely. You could do a single dump of the table using a command like this: pg_dump -U <myuser> <mydb> ...


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In this case, the error message is quite clear. You have backed up a database from a SQL Server 2008R2 instance and tried to restore it on a SQL Server 2008 instance. It is not possible to restore databases to a previous version of SQL Server. This has to do with internal database structure differences between the versions. The only way to get your data ...


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While copying a tablespace, it automatically includes data files and indexes associated with it. You need to make sure that tablespace is self contained. Confirm that tablespace is self contained execute DBMS_TTS.TRANSPORT_SET_CHECK('<TABLESPACENAME>', true); Use the TRANSPORT_SET_VIOLATIONS view to check if any violations condition exists select * ...


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I think just -- exporting db and taking out the json file and import in another system. Or You can directly copy the db from one location to another---- http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/method/db.copyDatabase/


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RESTORE DATABASE Tfs_CoE FROM DISK = 'D:\Backupfolder\Tfs_CoE.bak' WITH MOVE 'Tfs_CoE' TO 'D:\MSSQL12.SQLSERVERSECOND\MSSQL\DATA\Tfs_CoE.mdf', MOVE 'Tfs_CoE_Log' TO 'D:\MSSQL12.SQLSERVERSECOND\MSSQL\DATA\Tfs_CoE.ldf', RECOVERY, REPLACE; See RESTORE (Transact-SQL) for the full documentation.


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Community Wiki answer generated from comments on the question, from Bob Klimes, Sean Gallardy, and Aaron Bertrand. You'll need to enable Instant File Initialization (IFI) on the server holding the disk. Restart SQL Server for it to take effect. You can test if IFI is working on the share by creating a database on the share with trace flags 3004 and 3605 ...


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Before doing any changes and attempts, take complete backup of your databases. If you have physical backup of your database: Restore your database in a temporary instance. Identify the point from binary logs where the changes were made and you want to ignore them. Extract DMLs after that point till latest to SQL file. Run the SQL against the new mysql ...


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Load your data in another database. Run LEFT JOINs one way, then the other way, to see what was deleted/new. Run a JOIN to see if the rows that exist in both are the same; fix if necessary. Run a multi-table DELETE to get rid of the the appropriate rows. Run INSERT...SELECT..LEFT JOIN to copy the missing rows in


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I use SQLyog to have a backup of the database,which would help me to rewrite the data into the database by importing the backed-up data. And not only that i can also import the data by executing a sql script containing the table syntax and data.


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RMAN uses backupsets by default. The following commands will create a backup to a backupset: RMAN> backup database; RMAN> backup database plus archivelog; This is assuming that you haven't changed the default RMAN parameters: RMAN> SHOW ALL; ... CONFIGURE DEFAULT DEVICE TYPE TO DISK; # default CONFIGURE DEVICE TYPE DISK PARALLELISM 1 BACKUP ...


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Please pay attention. The answer from Julien is correct. BUT if you attach the database to an SQL Server 2008 instance it will be upgraded! If the application can't handle SQL Server 2008 and needs SQL Server 2005 you're in trouble. Take an extra step and make a backup. Furthermore you have to create the needed logins on the new server. You might want to ...


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You first have to detach it on your old server: USE Master GO -- drop all active connections and roll back open transactions ALTER DATABASE YourDB SET SINGLE_USER WITH ROLLBACK IMMEDIATE GO -- detach it EXEC sp_detach_db 'YourDB' GO On your new server, once the files have been move, you can now attach it: USE master; GO CREATE DATABASE YourDB ON ...


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I suppose that you looked at the Oracle site (http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/backup.111/b28270/rcmquick.htm)? If not then look here: http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2013/08/oracle-rman-backup/.


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Given only the single server for production. Since you didn't mention a dev environment. If I were me, I'd run an export of the warehouse1 structure. No data to go with it. Then I'd invest some time to generate testdata. They don't need to be live data. They'd have to represent usecases. Given the structure and testdata, I'd have everything I need for ...


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Normally when you want to restore a database from a different server, you're looking to create a device backup to a network drive, and restore from that. The way the restore from database interface works is by querying the msdb database for recent backups, to see what you can restore. Accordingly you should be using a device backup: If the backup is ...


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Your best bet to get some well researched guidance on this topic is to look up "Extract, Transform, and Load" processing, abbreviated ETL. ETL processing has been extensively studied, especially as it relates to data warehouses and data marts. Your reporting database is a little like a data mart. There are tools for this that you can buy and use off the ...


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You can replicate Transaction to Reporting without any issues are it's "independent" but Reporting to Transactional may cause issues depending on your foreign-key settings. You can easily replicate single table with the help of replication filters (in your case replicate-do-table or replicate-wild-do-table). There are plenty of blogs for replication setup ...


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note that when you ran the RESTORE FILELISTONLY look at the column IsPresent and for the readonly file it shows 0 this mean that this file does not exists in the backupset. anyway this file cannot be restored from that backup set because it does not exists there, so you must take it from a full backup (or just a file backup) the only option to reset the ...


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Adding important information about OS User name and Machine Name: Select Destination_database_name, restore_date, database_name as Source_database, Physical_device_name as Backup_file_used_to_restore, bs.user_name, bs.machine_name from msdb.dbo.restorehistory rh inner join msdb.dbo.backupset bs on ...



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