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8

No, you still need archived redo logs. An RMAN backup is not the same as a cold backup; when you restore it you need to apply all the redo generated from the time you started the backup until the time the backup completed in order to get the SCN consistent across all the datafiles and the controlfile. Let us consider the old fashioned hot backup. In this ...


5

In short - yes, there are standard operating procedures for doing all of this with Oracle. You should start by looking into RMAN (Recovery MANager). I have put together a high level overview of RMAN as well as an introduction to Oracle backups for SQL Server DBAs. I suggest watching both of those and then heading over to the Oracle Database Backup and ...


4

Issue switch to copy, then crosscheck.


4

Backing up Archive logs is only necessary when running in Archive log mode, so the question comes back to whether the database should do this or not. This is covered in the same document you reference under the heading Deciding Between ARCHIVELOG and NOARCHIVELOG Mode. Here is an excerpt: Deciding Between ARCHIVELOG and NOARCHIVELOG Mode The redo ...


4

If I correctly understand your question as: "I want to create a standby database and later on take backups on the primary like if there would be no standby present" In this case, you do not need a recovery catalog: quote "An RMAN recovery catalog is required so that backups taken on one database server can be restored to another database server. It is not ...


4

If my source database uses SPFILE then do I have create a PFILE from the SPFILE? Yes, you need to create a temporary PFILE to use while duplicating the database. You will later switch the new instance to use the SPFILE. Use CREATE PFILE = 'path/to/pfile' FROM SPFILE; You only need to create directories that are referenced in the PFILE or SPFILE. ...


4

The first thing RMAN does it automatically perform an ALTER SYSTEM ARCHIVE LOG CURRENT to switch logfiles so that the active log at the point the backup was started will be included. It doesn't do this in all backup situations, but this answers your question.


4

Query this table in order for you to see the platforms to which rman can convert your SYS@EMR> select * from V$DB_TRANSPORTABLE_PLATFORM; PLATFORM_ID PLATFORM_NAME ENDIAN_FORMAT ----------- ...


3

The "device" in RMAN is a misnomer, it should be really called "storage". The "sbt" (synonym of "sbt_tape") is a misnomer again, as it has NOTHING to do with any tapes, it should be simply called "non-rman". This is just an empty placeholder, to be filled with any "plugin"; the plugin is called by Oracle either the "Media Manager library" or SBT_LIBRARY. ...


3

You need to use the catalog command in RMAN to make the file known to the database (don't worry, this does not depend on a recovery catalog!)


3

A Cold Backup is making a copy of the files with the database closed. These commands are both for hot backups using RMAN. They are both preferred over cold backups due to their flexibility. The difference between the two commands is whether or not archive logs are backed up. If you need be able to recover to any point between your backups or anytime ...


3

Each redo log file (and archived redo log file) contains starting SCN and ending SCN. In case it is a last redo, the ending SCN is 0xffffffffffff. nap01:~/oradata/jt10g$ strings redo01.log|head -3 z{|} JT10G Thread 0001, Seq# 0000000004, SCN 0x0000000b05b5-0x0000000bd34f nap01:~/oradata/jt10g$ strings redo02.log|head -3 z{|} JT10G Thread 0001, Seq# ...


3

The answer to your question is no, however.... It sounds like a flashback query is what you need. Query the data as of a time when it existed and when it returns the correct data, insert it into the current table. This solution does require space in the UNDO tablespace sufficient to meet your UNDO_RETENTION requirements. It also doesn't use RMAN, but is ...


3

Oracle Support closed bug 14226856 as "not a bug" and said it will be fixed in 12c.


3

Depending on your requirements and what other backups you have done since then, you could use (from http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/backup.111/b28270/rcmreprt.htm#BRADV89594): REPORT NEED BACKUP RECOVERY WINDOW OF n DAYS Displays objects requiring backup to satisfy a recovery window-based retention policy. REPORT NEED BACKUP REDUNDANCY n Displays ...


2

Doing a LIST EXPIRED ARCHIVELOG and then a DELETE EXPIRED ARCHIVELOG should cause a new LIST EXPIRED ARCHIVELOG to not show any entries in most situations. Here are a few situations that could cause this to not be the case. If FORCE is not specified on the delete command then it follows the archived log deletion policy which determines when archived redo ...


2

Yes, if you want to prevent a level 1 from being created without a corresponding level 0 being available, then you need to do a crosscheck in the script so RMAN knows that the level 0 is not available. Prior to 10g (or with compatibility < 10.0) Oracle would do a level 0 when a level 1 was done without a level 0. Since you are on 11g, I would expect ...


2

Incremental level 1 cummulative is a backup only the blocks that have changed since the last incremental 0 backup @George3 you should have mentioned incremental level 0 not any incremental.


2

An INCREMENTAL LEVEL 0 is a full backup of all used blocks in the database. An INCREMENTAL LEVEL 1 CUMULATIVE is a backup of only the blocks that have changed since the last incremental backup. ... the definitions above paraphrased from the Glossary of Oracle Database Backup and Recovery User's Guide 11g Release 2.


2

Figured out the problem. Simply changing the Autobackup Format back to the default '%F' is not viewed as the default. In order to truly have the default value you must use the clear command. CONFIGURE CONTROLFILE AUTOBACKUP FORMAT FOR DEVICE TYPE DISK CLEAR; RMAN behaivor returned to normal. Thanks to all who viewed my question!


2

Your requirements look like a good case for Oracle's Flashback Data Archive (Total Recall) feature. Disclaimer: I haven't used this feature yet. The description reads: A Flashback Data Archive provides the ability to track and store transactional changes to a table over its lifetime. A Flashback Data Archive is useful for compliance with record stage ...


2

Jay, this isn't officially documented, so I'm speaking only from my own experience. In RMAN, the command BACKUP DATABASE ... is synonymous with BACKUP DATAFILE 1, 2, ..., n-th .... Also the command RESTORE DATABASE ... is synonymous with RESTORE DATAFILE 1, 2, ..., n-th .... I'm not sure about RECOVER DATABASE; it might be also a synonym of RECOVER ...


2

Here is Oracle's answer. Basically your options are these: Delete transient files no longer needed for current policies. Change something stored in the Fast Recovery Area to be stored elsewhere This could be temporarily or permanently. Increase the db_recovery_file_dest_size to be larger than 7 GB. Decrease your backup window or redundancy. Change your ...


2

If you want to clone prod. db into dev. env. regulary I would recommend you to use RMAN for whole database. Or exp/imp (expdp/impdp) for single schema. RMAN is not easy to use for developers who have no Oracle experience, but finally you will find this approach fastest and safest. If you're about to clone your prod db into some reporting server maybe you ...


2

RMAN only works at the block level & has no idea about the contents of a given block, and therefore cannot do this. You need to use expdp with the query parameter: expdp phil/phil directory=myexportdir dumpfile=yourtable.dmp query=yourtable:\"where groupid in (1,2,3)\" tables=yourtable Obviously, this isn't incremental. There's no really easy way of ...


2

Yes, if the database is open in read-write mode there is always a number of changes to database that reside only in the current redo log and not in any archived log. If you want protect the current redo against hardware-related corruption, you need to add redundant storage (with either a remote replication or local mirror). If you want to protect the current ...


2

You're issuing a "recover database" command, which will recover the database as far as possible. If that includes the archivelogs/redo logs which contain your "truncate" command, then this will also be re-played and the table truncated again. Try doing the restore on it's own, or recovering to a specific time using RECOVER UNTIL... then opening the DB ...


2

The Oracle docs for 11.2 ASM migration are here: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e18951/asm_rman.htm#OSTMG12000 These explain the process that you need to go through to migrate to ASM from filesystem storage.


2

No need to de-install Oracle rdbms software. Just install and configure ASM. If you have enough storage available you can copy your database to ASM using rman.


1

The RMAN backup concepts guide (link for 11gR2, but the concept hasn't changed): The only difference between a level 0 incremental backup and a full backup is that a full backup is never included in an incremental strategy. Full and level zero backups copy all blocks that have data (and more if you're doing image copies), so they are both "full" in ...



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