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I've never heard of comments causing a problem. The code you captured from the running server and the posted source are for different SPs. It makes me think that maybe the ..SU01 version is still in your database and being executed (from a job perhaps?) whereas you are trying to debug the ..SU012_XML code. For testing you could add another INSERT to the ...


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Idera SQL Permissions Extractor seems to be the product you're looking for. It can script server and object permissions and it is free. There is also a commercial edition, called SQL Secure which has more features. The feature comparison between the two editions can be found here.


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Do you have Microsoft Dynamics installed? There's a clear reference to a Master80 account in the above link: Expand your instance of SQL Server. Expand Security. Double-click Logins. Right-click Master60Sp (Master80 in Dynamics SL 2011), and then click Delete.


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You could assign the current context to a cookie then revert to that cookie when you desire to.


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This really isn't an SQL Server issue - it seems more of a firewall issue. If you are in a situation where your SQL Servers are directly accessible from dudes in china - I'd be sorting out why no one in your outfit is handling networking/firewalls etc It sounds quite possible that you need to be worried about more servers than just the one you've noticed ...


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My initial thought was a logon trigger but, sadly, those only fire after a successful login. The documentation for the Audit Login Failed Event Class says that failed login audits will include the application name, but I haven't observed that so far (I only tested failed logins from changing connections within Management Studio, so maybe it is exposed in ...


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This is the correct ORDER: Create Login Login_Name WITH Password = 'PassWord', sid = 0x498SID038302373,


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Some steps to reduce these vulnerabilities can be found here: Disable the login that is being attacked. In most cases, the login would be a generic sa or admin account. This will disable access to the account. However, the server may still be vulnerable to outside attacks. Change name of the account that is being attacked. For instance, change the ...


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As pointed above by Jeremy, permissions can almost always be found on the corresponding reference document within Books Online for SQL Server. On these reference documents, there is typically a section titled Permissions (typically towards the bottom of the document) which contains your desired data. CREATE LOGIN (copied directly from the reference) ...



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