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Nowadays, network latency is rarely a big issue, so if your query lasts long, it's because of the disk. The best way to monitor the progress, would be to look exactly where it does most of the work, ie. the Oracle server. So try to gain access on the OEM, and monitor the execution from there. You might also find out why it lasts so long. As long as your ...


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Is there some table in MS SQL 2005 that tracks how much data has been imported or bytes sent and received? So I can try and monitor this or check how this is going? The simplest way to do this is the query the management views associated with the currently-executing request, the session, or the connection: sys.dm_exec_requests sys.dm_exec_sessions ...


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So one potential way of doing this would be to write your SQL Server query to output an XML string of the data you want to send by using FOR XML. You could then create an SSIS package and use a Data Flow Task to save the XML to an XML file, meaning you're logging all the exports made. A script task, following the success of the Data Flow Task, can then do ...


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"We made a full backup and restored it on the new server. The server specification are the same for both: X5650 @ 2.67GHz (4procs) 16 GB RAM" You bought a new server with the exact same specs as the old one? Or is this a VM? Including all the points Kin made above, you need to install SP1 up through the latest Cumulative Update. There are many ...


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What I usually do with our 15-minute log shipping secondary servers is just wait until the last log is copied over and restored. Then you can reboot the secondary server (assuming that by server you mean a separate physical server). As soon as the secondary comes back up, it will copy over the missing transaction log file and restore them. We restore our ...


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There can be many things to address. Below is an outline of things to check before jumping on any conclusions : First, your sequence of POST restore steps will mess up all the work you did. Never shrink your database and that too especially after doing Index maintenance. Read up - Why you should not shrink your data files by Paul Randal. Below are my ...


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Came across this issue as well. We are keeping our 2008R2 edition for this very reason. Starting with SQL Server 2012, each edition of SQL Server has two compute capacity limits: A maximum number of Sockets (Same as Physical processor or Socket or Processor package). A maximum number of cores as reported by the operating system. ...


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Use third-party backup software (I would recommend EMS SQL Backup) which can backup databases 'on the fly'. It uses Virtual Device Interface and compresses the stream before writing on disk. This approach allows minimizing disk subsystem load (that is often a bottleneck) and significantly decrease the backup process time.


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You can't restore a 2008 backup on SQL Server 2005. Simply not possible. You'll need to either: (a) Restore it on 2008, then use Import/Export wizard, Generate Scripts Wizard, Copy Database Wizard, SSIS, 3rd party tools like SQL Compare, etc. to move the structure and data to the 2005 instance, or (b) Upgrade. Developer Edition is $50 or so.


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It is certainly possible to use a Maintenance Plan to handle the fragmentation issues. However, many people use the free scripts at: http://ola.hallengren.com/sql-server-index-and-statistics-maintenance.html I am part of the 'many people'. These scripts by default implement the suggested standards for reducing the fragmentation of indexes. So, if you ...


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You could probably have just set the database owner to [sa] (or any valid login really) rather than detach / re-attach. ALTER AUTHORIZATION ON DATABASE::dbname TO [sa]; This probably happened because the login responsible for creating, attaching or restoring the database initially no longer exists. The UI isn't smart enough to fail gracefully when there ...


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I asked for something built in back in 2007, but this was rejected for the 2008 release, and subsequently ignored. Feel free to vote and, more importantly, comment about your business need. In the meantime, for SQL Server 2005 and 2008, you should be able to pull this information from the default trace: DECLARE @FileName VARCHAR(MAX) SELECT @FileName = ...


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Here's a query that should get you started on finding out the information you're looking for: select top 10 tsu.session_id, tsu.request_id, r.command, s.login_name, s.host_name, s.program_name, total_objects_alloc_page_count = tsu.user_objects_alloc_page_count + tsu.internal_objects_alloc_page_count, ...


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The example below uses a CTE to find the gaps in your TimeScheduleId sequence. The field HasPreviousItem identifies if a row is the first in a sequence and RowNum is used to number all of the records. To find the start dates/times select for records where HasPreviousItem = 0. The Duration assumes that each record is a 15 minute block of time. The ...



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