Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

3

As per MS here The Maintenance Cleanup task removes files related to maintenance plans, including database backup files and reports created by maintenance plans. By using the Maintenance Cleanup task, a package can remove the backup files or maintenance plan reports on the specified server. The Maintenance Cleanup task includes an option to ...


3

Since the additional trace flags allowed you to narrow the delay down to the stage where the process tries to write to msdb, I'm willing to bet one or both of these returns high numbers: SELECT MAX(row_count), SUM(in_row_reserved_page_count) FROM msdb.sys.dm_db_partition_stats WHERE [object_id] = OBJECT_ID('msdb.dbo.backupset'); SELECT database_name, ...


3

There are basically two things to consider: You cause fragmentation when shrinking the database If the database grew yesterday, there's a good chance it will grow again tomorrow. To address 1, you need to defrag indexes once you've shrunk the database. The database will grow when you do this, although probably not back to the original size. To address ...


2

Partitioning will likely not help, unless the user query in the deadlock can be rewritten in order to let partition elimination kick in. I would focus on making both operations in the deadlock graph as fast as possible instead. This will involve ad-hoc indexing or rewriting the query in a different form. If the replication agent is often the deadlock ...


2

I feel really stupid for not thinking about this earlier. I'm so used to SQL Management Studio not requiring changes to be committed. I also thought that the changes were being committed on oracle, because my select statements reflected the changes made. I found the solution to my problem was upon changing data in Oracle SQL Developer I needed to ...


2

Sounds like you have a DDL trigger that is set to listen for ALTER_LOGIN events, and is trying to pass EVENTDATA() directly to some remote procedure. Check for this using: USE master; GO SELECT OBJECT_DEFINITION([object_id]) FROM sys.server_triggers WHERE OBJECT_DEFINITION([object_id]) LIKE N'%ALTER[_]LOGIN%'; It could also be a database-level DDL ...


2

Even though, @KASQLDBA has answered the question, below will supplement his answer from a different perspective : Since you are using SQL Server 2012, you should use NATIVE COMPRESSION as opposed to using third party 7z. Backup compression can be enabled using : USE master; GO EXEC sp_configure 'backup compression default', '1'; RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE; ...


1

Well, for one, you really shouldn't be moving database files around using detach/attach: Bad Habits : Using MDF/LDF Files as "Backups" The problem probably happened because you reused MDF/LDF files for new databases with different names - the files keep the properties of the original database even if the new database has a different name and the files ...


1

Here it is: the failing login in question was a SQL Server login. Here is how we configured the SQL connection manager properties for old, new, and developer environments: ServerName - MyServer InitialCatalog - MyDB UserName - MyUser Password - *********** ConnectionString - Data Source=MyServer;User Id=MyUser;Initial ...


1

My boss ask me for possibilities to do the encryption on content DB level, it backup. or on column level? This is something you and You're boss need to sit and discuss on as what could be pros and cons of using TDE or Cell level encryption: However Few points to note: TDE does not offer the granularity of protection that cell-level encryption ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible