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No*, it won't. The Package Deployment Model, if deployed to the database, will store individual packages in msdb.dbo.syspackages90 (SQL Server 2005) and msdb.dbo.sysssispackages (SQL Server 2008+) The Project Deployment Model, deploys to the SSISDB. There it takes the form of Folders/Projects/Packages which are stored in SSISDB.catalog.folders ...


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How can I tell which type of deployment a package has taken? Look at the definition of your SQL Agent Job Step. If it specifies /file then the package has been to deployed to the file system somewhere. If it specifies /DTS then it's using a well known location on the SQL Server installation path (precise location eludes my memory as of this posting but ...


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Does the service account for the SQL Server Agent have access to the directories for the objects being modified by the Excel macro? My experience is when code works in your development tools but fails when running through the SQL Server Agent, it is because the service account for the SQL Server Agent is missing permissions that your user account has when ...


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Did I understand this correctly that your customer has MSSQL Server? Source Database MSSQL or other You have two options: Script your own replication Use Oracle Golden Gate to stream the data to your Oracle Database. Golden Gate supports "zero downtime" migration. Source Database Oracle Additionally to the options mentioned in "Source Database MSSQL ...


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You could use a script component which is supported in 2016 and previous versions. Make sure that when you add the component you select "source" as the type and not destination or transformation. Then you add a reference to System.Web.Extensions.dll to the task and write some code to consume the webservice. This blog post looks like it documents the ...


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When you run the package from msdb it executes on the machine that you are running it from. (Unlike packages stored in the 2012+ SSISDB catalog where executing them spawns an execution process on the Server itself). You must have installed SQL Server Integration Services onto your own machine from the SQL Server installation media, whereas your colleague ...


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So apparently network packet size setting in sp_configure was changed up to 32kb when it needed to be under 16kb. Once I reconfigured the setting, the jobs ran successfully. Who would have thought...


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One issue with your trigger implementation is that if the reporting DB or DB Server goes down for any reason or stops accepting requests, your prod systems will stop as well. Also if you make schema changes note that you'll need to do that on the reporting table as well. Your solution will work, it just isn't ideal. SSIS won't help with the schema changes ...


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You have delivered a solution that uses SSIS. SSIS requires an installation of SQL Server Standard, BI, or Enterprise Edition (depending on components used). At this point, your client will need to spend ~ 8k per core (SE) to 23k per core (EE) for a license of SQL Server for their desktop. That's probably not what they're expecting. What can you do? ...


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you can split a large text to smaller chunks, in the rows and load them in foreach loop container, Declare @maxRowLength int = 50; with x as ( select 'Lorem Ipsum is simply dummy text of the printing and typesetting industry. Lorem Ipsum has been the industry''s standard dummy text ever since the 1500s. Over the years, sometimes by accident, sometimes on ...


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You can use a script transformation to create the actual column mapping. For your flat file source, make every output line become a single large column. In your script transformation, create column definitions for each column you need mapped / already know about. This assumes your first line contains headers: Then, in your script transformation , split ...



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