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12

The line in your netstat report shows that the database is only listening on localhost:5432 (127.0.0.1) for incoming tcp connections. Proto Recv-Q Send-Q Local Address Foreign Address State PID/Program name tcp 0 0 127.0.0.1:5432 0.0.0.0:* LISTEN 3561/postgres So it can only accept local tcp connections regardless of what ...


8

According to the MySQL Documentation, the InnoDB Buffer Pool is set to 128MB by default in MySQL 5.5. You can show how much of the InnoDB Buffer Pool is in use and reserved as follows: SELECT BufferPoolUsed BytesUsed, (BufferPoolUsed / power(1024,1)) UsedKB, (BufferPoolUsed / power(1024,2)) UsedMB, (BufferPoolUsed / power(1024,3)) UsedGB, ...


8

Are you running from the 10gen repository or from the default Debian/Ubuntu repo? I recommend using the official 10gen repository. Check this link out - [10gen MongoDB How-To Install on Ubuntu:] http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/tutorial/install-mongodb-on-ubuntu/. It is best to uninstall the previous mongodb installation prior to this change, which will also ...


7

This part is unusual: ORACLE_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/product/11.2.0/xe/ This needs to be char-by-char identical every time. I see it ends with a slash here, which is non-standard, and I suspect that you've added it by mistake. Adding a slash will result in "ORACLE not available" in so-called bequeath sqlplus, I've just experimented on my system. Try again ...


6

Memory usage in linux in general and for Postgres in particular is a pretty complex subject, a good starting point is Bruce Momjians blog covering the subject and the usage of smem. It is well worth following the links in Chris Seibenmanns blog on the subject.


6

postgres=> \l Liste der Datenbanken Name | Eigent├╝mer | Kodierung | Sortierfolge | Zeichentyp | Zugriffsprivilegien ----------------+------------+-----------+--------------+------------+----------------------- postgres | postgres | UTF8 | de_AT.utf8 | de_AT.utf8 | template0 | ...


6

Ubuntu or Debian can run multiple instances of PostgreSQL and provide a specific way to autostart/stop/start each cluster. There should be a file named start.conf inside /etc/postgresql/9.2/main (or more generally /etc/postgresql/<version>/<clustername>) with these self-explanatory contents: # Automatic startup configuration # auto: automatically ...


5

"no space left on the device" could also mean that the partition is out of inodes. Use df -i to check inode usage. Edit: Each file, directory, and symbolic link requires one inode. So the idea is to remove some files from the / partition. It doesn't matter how large the files are. You can of course just pick some files on the partition and move them to ...


4

The buffer pool is used by MySQL for caching InnoDB data and indexes in memory. It is not the total memory used but your MySQL DB If your InnoDB tables are that small 128MB is more than enough and effectively all InnoDB tables will be treated as in-memory tables. The 128Mb is a limit of how large the buffer can be and it is only filled when needed. You can ...


4

I find that error particularly disturbing because MySQL introduced INFORMATION_SCHEMA with the introduction of MySQL 5.0. @gbn's answer shows that this bug goes back to MySQL 5.0.16 was reported on ANY operating having this was based on the error happening in the IBM AIX 5.3 ML2 Operating System was closed 2006-01-26 MySQL's definition of a database is ...


4

perhaps you mean listing users and their privileges for a database - I can't quite tell from the question: postgres=> \du List of roles Role name | Attributes | Member of -----------------+--------------+------------------------------------------------ dba | Create role | ...


4

You can use the environment variable PGOPTIONS. Either set it permanently or just when you call psql, e.g., PGOPTIONS='--statement-timeout=1min' psql ... This works for any libpq client, including psycopg. Of course you could also just put the SET statement in the psqlscript.


4

Oracle has an alert log which should tell you when and why it shut down. Depending on how the database was configured, that will be under a directory identified by either the diagnostic_dest or background_dump_dest parameters, and will be called alert.xml or alert.log (in previous versions). If you're running it, you can get information from Enterprise ...


4

If you are using InnoDB tables, the size of your ibdata files will grow over time. So, if you issue DELETE statement, your database size will reduce, but the ibdata file will remain the same (not reduce). If you are not using innodb_file_per_table option, the only way to reclaim the space is by dumping the database and restoring from the dumpfile. However, ...


4

There error is telling ... The problem is that you ran initdb as your local login, but I'm pretty that your login (username) doesn't have access to /var/run/postgresql. If you have a clean install, may I recommend that you remove the data directory and start all over, this time by su-ing into the postgres account: username@jupiter:~$ sudo su - postgres ...


4

UPDATE: it looks like this is a bug in the Debian/Ubuntu packaging of PostgreSQL, where the init scripts - extremely unsafely - kill -9 the postmaster and remove postmaster.pid. See this post on pgsql-general. See: https://bugs.launchpad.net/debian/+source/postgresql-common/+bug/1042556 http://bugs.debian.org/cgi-bin/bugreport.cgi?bug=686060 ...


4

You can turn off (and on) the paging in psql: \pset pager [on|off] If you don't specify on or off, the command will toggle the setting. (More on \pset in the documentation.) In the shell, you can even set the pager you want to use: PAGER=/usr/bin/less If you start psql after this, less will be your pager.


4

OBSERVATION #1 Since your buffer pool is 6G (6144M), the innodb_log_file_size should be 1536M (25% of 6G) OBSERVATION #2 You have sync_binlog set to 1. This provides the safest ACID compliant setup. It can also slow things down dramatically. You say it seems as though its writing each row 1 at a time to disk. That's the case because each completed DML ...


4

I think the permissions are correct because otherwise you wouldn't have gotten here. My guess is that a modification you have made has caused the problem. This is particularly the case given that it is a segmentation fault. What you really need to do is look at the call stack at the time the core was dumped and see if you can isolate where in the code ...


3

Your grants are not replicating because you have an (unnecessary) replication filter on INFORMATION_SCHEMA. There is no reason to exclude this, as it is not replicated anyhow. When replication filters are in place, you have to USE a database or your statements are not replicated. For example...not replicated Grant all privileges on *.* to foo@localhost ...


3

DISCLAIMER : I am not a PostgreSQL DBA, though I dabble a lot with it. You probably need to check your timezone in the OS and in psql. In the OS run this: [postgres@radarPG-db1 ~]$ date Fri Jun 17 12:55:37 EDT 2011 In psql, run the following: postgres=# SELECT EXTRACT(timezone_hour FROM now()),EXTRACT(timezone_minute FROM now()); date_part | date_part ...


3

As statement_timeout is described in postgres's documentation on client configuration, I would assume it's a setting for the session, so you should be able to just send the set command before your query. As for how to do it with psycopg2, I have no idea. Looking through the docs shows a set_isolation_level and set_client_encoding ... you might want to look ...


3

For JDBC based tools such as Squirrel you should try to use (even with Oracle8i) a 9.x or even a 10.x driver (not sure about the 10.x though). Maybe they give better performance. Somewhere on the JDBC download page of Oracle there is a compatibility Matrix that shows which driver version is compatible with which database version. Another cross-platform ...


3

Have you looked into the mysqld_multi tool ? This will allow you to run different configurations and different distros using the same configuration file (/etc/mysql/my.cnf) and you could adjust the init.d script to use the mysqld_multi commands instead of mysqld. Another tool might be mysql sandbox, but I've never used that personally on any distro.


3

To clear the WAL files, see pg_resetxlog. The data directory on Ubuntu 12 should be /var/lib/postgresql/9.1/main Note that pg_resetxlog is located in /usr/lib/postgresql/9.1/bin, not in /usr/bin, so it's not necessarily in $PATH. Also it should be run as the postgres user. To clear and recreate the entire cluster if you don't care about the data, run: ...


3

While I wait for your logs (see comments), there are two common causes for this: Bad permissions on the log file, or other bad permissions in the data path. Make sure you chown/chmod everything under the /media/newdrive/data folder. Something similar to this: sudo chown -R mongodb:mongodb /media/newdrive/data Then make sure your other mongod instance ...


3

Your databases will remain untouched (though of course I can't be liable :) ). The reason are are being asked for a password could be: Your new Ubuntu version uses a newer version of MySQL (it does). It needs root password so as to run the mysql_upgrade utility, which upgrades internal mysql schema to fit new version You new installation includes new ...


3

Find the postgresql installation folder containing pg_hba.conf. Edit the authentication chapter at the end of this file, adding local all all trust host all all 127.0.0.1/32 trust host all all ::1/128 trust and restart. After that postgresql should not ...


3

Unfortunately, yes, you'll need to reduce the size of your root LV. (You could reduce the size of swap, too, but that's already a fairly small volume) Even if you can use that 4MB, a snapshot of your root volume will become invalid quite quickly when LVM runs out of "free" disk space. You get prompted with a text box asking how much of your disk to use ...


3

It depends a great deal on your workload - the write volumes and write patterns on the master. The standby is essentially doing continuous crash recovery. It reads write-ahead logs containing the changes the master made to the tables and applies that to its own tables. It does this using a single worker, so it doesn't benefit significantly from I/O ...



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