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-1

It may the reason the user doesn't have permission to access mysql Try with root user directly if mysql doesn't having any password orelse try "mysql -u username -p".


1

That is not how you start mysql from the command line. When you type mysql in the command line it will launch the mysql-client not the mysql-server, which looks for the user/password options to be provided as arguments, if they aren't provided it will expect them to be specified in ~/.my.cnf or /etc/mysql/my.cnf. If it still can't find the details there ...


-1

Did someone GRANT ... TO 'amtz'@'localhost'; ? Apparently not. When mysql (not mqsql) is first installed user=root can get in without a password. That user should promptly assign a password to root and GRANT other users access.


1

What version are you running? 5.6 doc gives the details: innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit can be set (1) on the commandline, (2) in my.cnf, or (3) via SET GLOBAL. sql_safe_updates can only be set via SET SESSION or SET GLOBAL. Note that SET GLOBAL does not impact anyone currently connected (including yourself). It will effect anyone connecting later, but ...


0

How to install on Ubuntu is handled extremely well in the MongoDB Docs so I won't rehash that here (plus it is updated more frequently than this answer will be). Once you have installed MongoDB using that guide you can then modify the config file at /etc/mongod.conf to reflect your desired config (auth etc.). Finally, you then start/stop the database ...


2

Do you just want to use a certificate on the server which the clients use to authenticate the server? (This is the normal mode of operation). The server then authenticates the clients using password challenges just as if ssl were not being used. Or do you want to use client certificates to authenticate the clients to the server as well as the server to ...


1

You need to use sudo service to start MongoDB as a service, check the documentation for further details: sudo service mongod --auth --port 27017 --dbpath /var/lib/mongodb


0

Sounds like you didn't change the PGDATA environment variable, so postgres is looking in the original (no-longer-there) directory. Try this: http://stackoverflow.com/a/32575527/3657905


2

We had 2 problems: 1) We had one mysql query that used three joins. Turns out this function was crashing Mysql. We rewrote this query to use 4 mysql queries without joins and that solved that problem. (Bit of a hot-fix, we will probably rewrite the function so it is possible to cache it). 2) We were experiencing around 99.9 % I/O wait when we only used 10% ...



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