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59

Really Short Answer - In Place is okay. You can review your configuration afterwards and implement the best practices for SQL Server 2012. A Longer Answer on SQL Server Upgrades/Migrations So this is an opinion thing and there isn't a necessarily wrong or right answer but I prefer migration style upgrades over in-place for a lot of reasons. That being said ...


12

In my experience, the same decision making process should be made as prior. AFAIK there hasn't been any 'world changers' with SQL Server installation, within the MS SQL Server product in itself, and the potential problems you have when rolling out software with millions of lines of code. Something bad could happen and now you're stuck with no 'ROLLBACK' ...


11

Oracle 8.x.x has been out of support for some time. Apologies for the bad news, but your only option is to either recover the software from the dead disk, or ask Oracle (obviously with a valid support contract) for a copy of the software. Raise a ticket on My Oracle Support and they will help you.


10

30-90 minutes according to Oracle's Best Practices for Upgrading. This is about the closest estimate you will get given all the unknowns in this situation. The size of the database really matters very little in determining how long the upgrade will take. Here are the main factors effecting the duration (from the Oracle.com upgrade blog): Number of ...


9

Typically the features that you don't hear about from marketing are the ones that don't bring in all the money (e.g. pushed as "enterprise feaures" in order to sell Enterprise Edition). I answered a similar question here that provided a list of my favorite new features in 2012, that also aren't limited to Enterprise Edition: What are Objective Business ...


7

Given step 9 in the link you provided: 9.Run pg_upgrade ... Obviously, no one should be accessing the clusters during the upgrade. pg_upgrade defaults to running servers on port 50432 (sic) to avoid unintended client connections. You can use the same port numbers for both clusters because the old and new clusters will not be running at the same ...


7

This answer applies to modifying the PostgreSQL source code by applying a "diff" or "patch". It's not about installing minor version updates; to do that, just download and run the installer. To alter the PostgreSQL server its self or its procedural language runtimes, you will generally need to recompile PostgreSQL from scratch. On Windows that's a bit of ...


6

Without any information on the nature of the system (see my comment on the question) or why you're upgrading, it's difficult to offer any specific and/or concise advice. As a starting point, there are plenty of excellent checklists for building a new server, Brent Ozar and Jonathan Kehayias are two good examples. From the many recommendations in those ...


6

If you don't: it will be unmaintainable at some point because of OS, version, patch, whatever hardware failure may force an upgrade at the wrong time What you gain: older code can be simplified with new constructs (eg ROW_NUMBER) far better error handling (TRY/CATCH) engine improvements: most queries will run quicker on a later version MS don't ...


6

You need to get away from MySQL 5.1 ASAP MySQL 5.0 Active Support ended on December 31, 2009 - Now in Extended Support Phase Per the MySQL Support Lifecycle policy, active support for MySQL 5.0 ended on December 31, 2009. MySQL 5.0 is now in the Extended support phase. Versions have changed rapidly since Oracle stepped in MySQL 5.1.61 released 2012-01-11 ...


6

I tend to follow the following rule for existing code-base: If it's working fine, there is no need to upgrade unless there's a specific feature you are missing. InnoDB does get some nice performance boosts in 5.5, but if your current use-case is not seeing any issues with your install, why upgrade? If you ran some performance tests on a development ...


6

No, it shouldn't prevent the table from being altered. Though, if you drop the underlying table a view depends on, or alter/remove the columns from the table the view uses, the view can become invalid. You can check what views are invalid in your system with the following query: sql> select name from dba_objects where object_type = 'VIEW' and status = ...


5

Yes, according to Supported Version and Edition Upgrades you can upgrade in place from 2005 Standard to 2012 Enterprise, provided SQL Server 2005 is currently on an operating system supported by SQL Server 2012 Enterprise (meaning forget about XP or 2003 RTM) and that the architecture is the same (e.g. 64-bit -> 64-bit). Though you should do step 1 and 2 ...


5

Presumably, you have a development and test instance of this database running on similar hardware with a similar data volume and the same database components installed, correct? And, presumably, you will be upgrading these lower environments (and testing that whatever applications use this database still function correctly), correct? Assuming that is the ...


5

SQL 2008 to SQL 2008 R2 is not a big switch, but if you are going from Windows 2003 to Windows 2008 you will need to address the host based firewall. Other thigns to be concerned about are Agent jobs, permissions in master/msdb/model, migrating logins from one server to another, whether to do a backup restore to new server or in place upgrade, compatibility ...


5

It's failing when trying to run the old bin files because it's missing a dependency. You're going to need to install its dependencies, install 8.4 on the new server for this task, or spin up a VM with 8.4 installed, copy the files to the VM, do what it takes to start the 8.4 instance on the VM (which means that postgres will need to know where the default ...


5

Advice Never manually apply database changes; use scripts that are in a version control system (VCS). After initial deployment, store the "delta" scripts in the VCS. When upgrading, apply all scripts that are missing. Tracking the scripts that have been applied is a standard problem. Solutions There are tools to automate this task, including: Liquibase ...


5

You're unlikely to run into any issues with this but that said, it's rarely caution that gets a DBA fired. I'd probably go with installing a named instance, side-by-side with the existing instance. As you've got a test bed server up already I'd also suggest testing the application with 2012 Express. Why upgrade to an already out-dated version?


4

There can be some memory usage downgrade, especially if Sql Server uses Large Page Extensions, otherwise - all the issues are minimal and negligible.


4

The postgres database is just the default database that is created during initdb. It has no special meaning. If you created a different one where all your data is kept and you never created tables in the postgres database, then there is no need to dump it. I don't know what pg_upgradecluster is. The default tool to upgrade the data directory (apart from ...


4

Since 8.4, pg_upgrade is the alternate choice to dump-restore for upgrades between major versions. It is actually linked at the end of the doc page on migration you already mentioned. As for replaying WAL files from an older version, the doc says we can't: In general, log shipping between servers running different major PostgreSQL release levels is ...


4

It looks like you are already at Service Pack 1 (this is why MSSQLSERVER is checked and greyed out). 11.0.3000 and 11.1.3000 are essentially the same thing, different files just have different reasons for exposing a different number in the middle - that number is really not relevant to your problem. So now you just need to download and install the latest ...


3

The two constraints that you have specified: Very low downtime Limited disk space use conflict rather seriously. You have (wisely, IMO) excluded the option of using pg_upgrade with a custom rebuilt Pg, which is the only option I see that'd satisfy both those constraints. I suspect you'll have to drop the disk space constraint. The only way out of this ...


3

There's no standard process because every system is different. About the last thing that I would do if just wrap everything in a single transaction. What happens if I need to move 500 Gigs of data around? That's one massive transaction. Recently I've been using database snapshots as my rollback. Basically take a snapshot, make the changes. Delete the ...


3

Compatibility level simply changes the language syntax that is supported by the SQL Statements. This will cause all the execution plans to be expired and force them to be recompiled. It has nothing to do with the data storage engine or the way that the data is written to the disk. Once a database is attached to a SQL 2012 instance, it is in the SQL 2012 ...


3

initdb doesn't return until it's finished, so there shouldn't be any pause needed between it and server startup. There have been bugs in PostgreSQL where it completed without flushing everything to disk first though. I don't know of any left right now, but the nature of bugs is that you don't always know about them. If you use the pg_ctl command to start ...


3

This has to do with any table which contains a geospatial field. I'm not sure why yet (is it a bug or a feature lol), but that's the cause. Update: the problem only appears when there is a geospatial field and a PERSISTED column that uses it.


3

Your databases will remain untouched (though of course I can't be liable :) ). The reason are are being asked for a password could be: Your new Ubuntu version uses a newer version of MySQL (it does). It needs root password so as to run the mysql_upgrade utility, which upgrades internal mysql schema to fit new version You new installation includes new ...


3

Well, first off, if you are upgrading from 5.0 to 5.5, you really need to do this on a test server prior to making the upgrade in a production environment. This will get you comfortable with the steps of upgrading and let you figure out any trouble areas beforehand, which will dramatically reduce your downtime of upgrading. So to upgrade, I would upgrade ...


3

This may produce some false positives (e.g. you may have *= in a comment), but should be a good start: SELECT obj = QUOTENAME(SCHEMA_NAME(o.[object_id])) + '.' + QUOTENAME(o.name), o.type_desc FROM sys.sql_modules AS m INNER JOIN sys.objects AS o ON m.[object_id] = o.[object_id] WHERE m.definition LIKE '%=*%' OR m.definition LIKE '%*=%';



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