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bio website starshine.org/jimd
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visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Oct 10 at 5:59

Jun
11
awarded  Editor
Jun
11
comment Is there a way, in a single SQL statement to ensure that all items in a list are present in some column?
BTW: this example is just from some prototyping in SQLlite3 ... the actual application will be on PostgreSQL but should, ideally, but portable to MySQL as well.
Jun
11
revised Is there a way, in a single SQL statement to ensure that all items in a list are present in some column?
added 1570 characters in body
Jun
11
asked Is there a way, in a single SQL statement to ensure that all items in a list are present in some column?
Jun
26
awarded  Scholar
Jun
26
accepted Using an older MySQL binlog filename (with position zero)? Risks? Downsides?
May
17
awarded  Student
May
17
asked Using an older MySQL binlog filename (with position zero)? Risks? Downsides?
Apr
14
awarded  Supporter
Apr
13
awarded  Teacher
Apr
13
answered Is a Junction Table the same as a Weak Entity?
Apr
9
answered Which database engines will allow me to GRANT/REVOKE on a specific column?
Mar
31
comment What are the differences between NoSQL and a traditional RDBMS?
The important note here is that eschewing relations (foreign key) support in the database/server infrastructure relieves the database/servers from the load and lock-management overhead of maintaining referential integrity. The consequence of this, the trade-off, is that referential integrity, consistency, and the other ACID concerns are then pushed out to the applications. Many applications benefit from this rather than being limited by it. (Some applications have to be wedged into the client/server model).
Mar
29
comment Is REINDEX dangerous?
I'm thinking I was mistaken about it being row level security. Further reading suggests that it's more about the MVCC "visibility" (are some of those rows still locked in transactions which have yet to be committed).
Mar
29
answered Is REINDEX dangerous?
Mar
29
comment Is REINDEX dangerous?
I read somewhere that COUNT(*) performance issues in PostgreSQL can be caused by the need for the server to check the permissions on every tuple during the table scan (to determine which rows are visible to the entity performing the query).