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Nov
30
awarded  Yearling
Nov
11
comment pg_restore does not restore blobs
I don't think it is possibile to only extract some of them: they are all large objects referred by any table in the database you dump.
Nov
11
comment pg_restore does not restore blobs
Indeed this is the opposite: pg_restore uses exactly the same OID, but since a database is part of a cluster, and OID are used among all database in the cluster, it might be that you cannon import a large object because its OID is already taken. What I have to do is: create a new cluster, create a database, then restore on this new cluster. I cannot use a cluster that already include other database because some OIDs are always overlapping.
Nov
11
comment pg_restore does not restore blobs
So, you are changing the way backup is done. This is not the same problem I have, and I cannot change my procedure the same way you did. But I wonder, why do you extract all blobs one by one and store them in separate files? pg_dump and pg_restore are able to manage large objects (when the dump is not corrupt...)
Nov
11
answered pg_restore does not restore blobs
Nov
11
asked pg_restore does not restore blobs
Jul
28
awarded  Caucus
May
27
comment How to change the data directory on Postgresql 9.1 on Ubuntu
Hi @GaneshKrishnan, I tried with only bit "x" on all parent directories and that worked. Did you find a different behaviour? Is bit "r" really compulsory for all parent directories?
Dec
5
awarded  Good Answer
Nov
30
awarded  Yearling
Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
May
24
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
27
comment constraint in oracle
I think you have to write a trigger that check the number of members when inserting or updating on the member table.
Mar
11
awarded  Student
Jan
31
comment How to change table/indexes structure for a query with two aggregated colums
@ypercube I just checked, as you suggested, and they give the exact same timing. Plan show and "Index Scan" when using the DESC ordered index, or a "Index Scan Backward" when using an ASC ordered index.
Jan
31
comment How to change table/indexes structure for a query with two aggregated colums
@ypercube as shown in the answer, having created both indexes with ASC and DESC, Postgresql selected the DESC ones, so I assume it is the best/fastest index.
Jan
30
comment How to change table/indexes structure for a query with two aggregated colums
@Colin'tHart I still have to try with 9, but on 8.3 it was faster with DESC.
Jan
30
revised How to change table/indexes structure for a query with two aggregated colums
typo
Jan
30
comment How to change table/indexes structure for a query with two aggregated colums
I just added the reverse order for second field in index, so that MAX function just get the first record indexed.
Jan
30
revised How to change table/indexes structure for a query with two aggregated colums
Index ordered DESC