BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft

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194 reputation
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bio website blueraja.com/blog
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age
visits member for 1 year, 6 months
seen Aug 10 at 21:07

Jun
14
revised Why don't databases create their own indexes automatically?
added 6 characters in body
Jun
5
comment Why don't databases create their own indexes automatically?
@ypercube: ...Yes, I mentioned that in my answer; but it's still worth knowing about, at the very least as a point of interest. I also several mentioned other databases that are RDBMS's which do this, and explained why it's not common. This is definitely not deserving of a downvote...
Jun
4
awarded  Teacher
Jun
4
revised Why don't databases create their own indexes automatically?
added 93 characters in body
Jun
4
revised Why don't databases create their own indexes automatically?
added 165 characters in body
Jun
4
answered Why don't databases create their own indexes automatically?
May
29
awarded  Commentator
May
29
comment Is it common practice to mix InnoDB and MyISAM tables on same server?
@Aseph: Even at the time of your comment, InnoDB supported Fulltext indices‌​.
May
21
comment About single threaded versus multithreaded databases performance
"As I learned firsthand from the Percona NYC Conference, you should set this to 0 in order to alert InnoDB Storage Engine to find the best number of threads for the environment it is running in" - According to the documentation, a setting of 0 means "InnoDB [creates] as many threads as it needs." This does not mean it creates the best number of threads, it means it doesn't reuse threads in a threadpool. This will degrade performance with a large number of threads, as these performance benchmarks show.
May
19
awarded  Student
May
9
comment Is Oracle DB immune to the InnoDB deadlocks found in MySQL?
@RolandoMySQLDBA (and Justin): This answer seems to be in contrast with the answer to the linked question above. You two are saying a deadlock can only occur when more than one table/rows are locked in the incorrect order, and is the result of an application bug (this aligns with my experiences with other databases). However, the answer to the linked question states that deadlocks can occur even when writing to a single row of a single table, and are a normal expected occurance in InnoDB tables (not due to any application bugs), and can't be avoided. Is this true?
Mar
20
awarded  Editor
Mar
20
comment Why would splitting up a query make it faster, and can I/should I fix this?
The tables are all MyISAM - I'll try out your suggestions.
Mar
20
revised Why would splitting up a query make it faster, and can I/should I fix this?
edited body
Mar
20
comment Why would splitting up a query make it faster, and can I/should I fix this?
@Michael-sqlbot: Sorry, I renamed some of the to simplify the explanation of what's going on in the game (the body of the query is the same, though). I forgot to rename the tables in the EXPLAIN as well!
Mar
19
asked Why would splitting up a query make it faster, and can I/should I fix this?
Feb
14
comment Why are non-digits LIKE [0-9]?
Weird, I wonder why ¹ comes before 1 but ² comes after 2
Jan
26
comment What are the arguments against or for putting application logic in the database layer?
Ah, right, I had heard that. But, that is also an O/RM..
Jan
24
comment When is the right time to use MariaDB instead of MySQL, and Why?
While insightful, I don't understand how this answers the question
Jan
24
comment What are the arguments against or for putting application logic in the database layer?
@AndreiRinea: The website you are using right now (along with sister-site Stackoverflow, one of the top 100 most-visited sites in the world) uses the O/RM Linq2SQL, the precursor to Microsoft's Entity Framework (EF)