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Jun
17
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
13
awarded  Famous Question
Jan
5
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
May
28
awarded  Popular Question
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Feb
12
awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Popular Question
Jul
8
accepted When do you add your foreign keys?
Jul
8
comment When do you add your foreign keys?
That was my initial inclination as well, and seeing that I work for a small company and rarely get outside opinions on menial things like this, this was good to know. Gracias.
Jul
8
asked When do you add your foreign keys?
May
20
awarded  Caucus
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awarded  Constituent
Mar
31
comment Why is a hash match operator in this very basic query
Will do sir, thanks :)
Mar
31
accepted Why is a hash match operator in this very basic query
Mar
31
comment Why is a hash match operator in this very basic query
I was writing a lot of queries that did a lot of heavy duty work with the temporal aspect (fill date, script end date) of the data and I was trying whatever I could to get them sped up. There was another candidate key but I never joined on it because it was just a unique identifier of 12 alphanumeric characters. I was instead joining on a calendar table a lot to see the number and type of drugs prescribed on a given day, or during a given time period
Mar
31
comment Why is a hash match operator in this very basic query
So from that you could see my confusion when a perfectly good index is there :)
Mar
31
comment Why is a hash match operator in this very basic query
From the SQL Server Bible 2008 A hash match is an unordered join method that builds a temp table and iteratively matches with data from another table. A hash match is more efficient if one table is significantly larger than the other table. This is the worst-case join method and is used when no suitable index is available.
Mar
31
comment Why is a hash match operator in this very basic query
When parallelism happens is the work being done by different processor cores or are there too many unknowns to be able to answer that? (or is that a poor question to ask) So it seems there are times that it's unavoidable to have a hash match in your execution plans and you shouldn't always strive to compeletely eliminate them?
Mar
31
asked Why is a hash match operator in this very basic query