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seen Apr 23 '13 at 1:20

i haz teh codez


Sep
24
awarded  Autobiographer
Apr
22
awarded  Notable Question
Jul
9
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
26
comment Teradata: How to design table to be normalized with many foreign key columns?
COTW's is a good answer. I am referring to the other answer and some of the comments there. I'll just create this huge table tomorrow and blast a bunch of records into it and see how it goes. It will take a few hours, but it'll prob be the best way
Apr
26
comment Teradata: How to design table to be normalized with many foreign key columns?
I am thinking I am just going to have to wing it because I don't think anyone else is understanding my question or I am not understanding their answers.
Apr
26
comment Teradata: How to design table to be normalized with many foreign key columns?
I know how to do it in the app. The app is not the issue. This is outside the app when others will be querying the table with SQL. When they get results back, all they will see are meaningless numbers. Look at these numbers as foreign keys, except they refer to a record in a lookup table. I will need to create a view that returns things like Daily, Monthly, 8x5, etc instead of their key values. The only way I know how to do this is through a join which the answers says I don't need to do. Am I not explaining myself well here?
Apr
26
comment Teradata: How to design table to be normalized with many foreign key columns?
I am not so sure I understand the smart key concept and how it will keep me from having to join out to the primitives table. Populating dropdowns is easy with select * from primitives where type = 'interval'. The issue is that, when other apps/people go to select from the main table, all they will see are a bunch of meaningless numbers. How can I get a view to show Daily instead of 1 without using a join?
Apr
26
asked Teradata: How to design table to be normalized with many foreign key columns?
Aug
26
awarded  Student
Aug
26
comment Oracle 10g: Properly using ora_rowscn to detect table row changes (ie, inserts, updates, deletes)
Interesting info for an Oracle noob such as myself. So let's say I am dealing with a table of 300 records and 15 columns. If I were return select * from suppliers to a cursor, does all that data get cached in the same buffer?
Aug
26
awarded  Scholar
Aug
26
comment Oracle 10g: Properly using ora_rowscn to detect table row changes (ie, inserts, updates, deletes)
I marked yours as the answer because your article gave me exactly what I need to know. Good job, sir.
Aug
26
accepted Oracle 10g: Properly using ora_rowscn to detect table row changes (ie, inserts, updates, deletes)
Aug
26
comment Oracle 10g: Properly using ora_rowscn to detect table row changes (ie, inserts, updates, deletes)
I just did a max(ora_rowscn) on a table with 73,985 records and it took 0.078 seconds, so I think this will work out. After all, the alternative is to retrieve 213 records and then fill the .NET entity objects every time. Also, I don't think there will be a concurrency issue, but I don't want to convolute the discussion as to why I don't think so. In a nutshell, though, as long as both services cache the current date and time locally before writing that value to the database, I think it will work.
Aug
26
comment Oracle 10g: Properly using ora_rowscn to detect table row changes (ie, inserts, updates, deletes)
Thanks for the link to a good article. Unfortunately, we've already tried auditing, but the DBAs won't turn that on and are adamant about it for some reason. As far as the false positive you mention, this is okay because we're not looking to see if one row has been updated, but any row in the table, so I think ora_rowscn will work for us.
Aug
26
awarded  Supporter
Aug
26
comment Oracle 10g: Properly using ora_rowscn to detect table row changes (ie, inserts, updates, deletes)
I thought of something similar. If a record is inserted, updated, or deleted, it writes a date to a field in a table then stores that date in a static variable in the application. The next time it goes to retrieve the collection, it checks if the date in the db is new than the one stored in the static variable. If it is, it gets the collection from the db again. Otherwise, it uses the cached collection. I don't want to get the collection every time because it can be up to 500 records.
Aug
25
asked Oracle 10g: Properly using ora_rowscn to detect table row changes (ie, inserts, updates, deletes)