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location Brazil
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visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Mar 13 at 10:38

Mar
28
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
19
asked What is the “Other” Memory Pool in DB2 LUW?
Feb
19
comment Can High Water Mark be cleared?
Ok info, but doesn't actually answer the question.
Jan
18
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
16
awarded  Yearling
Jul
22
awarded  Self-Learner
May
21
awarded  Nice Question
May
15
awarded  Notable Question
May
3
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
20
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
17
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
2
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
5
comment BCP stops after the last “1000 rows sent to SQL Server. Total sent: …”
You could try using the DMVs or setting up a sql server trace to see what's going on and why it's taking so long.
Jan
5
comment How can I make only *one* user controlled database
Did you even bother to test this? Of course it doesn't work and even the syntax is wrong.
Jan
5
comment Safe way to truncate SQL Server Error Log
@JohnDaCosta what? No. Read the question again and take a closer look at the picture.
Jan
3
comment Point in time recovery from the same database - what does it mean?
In regard to question 2, the database will only enter in FULL recovery mode after the backup because without the first backup you won't have anything to restore the database logs to. This is called auto-truncate mode. sqlservergeeks.com/articles/sql-server-bi/4/…
Jan
3
comment SQL Server - contents of transaction log file in more detail
@NeverStopLearning you are using the term "roll back" to something else entirely. ROLLBACK is only possible from within the transaction. What you are talking about is recovery. The data contained in a TRUNCATEd table cannot be recovered from the log file because the TRUNCATE statement does not log individual rows as opposed to DELETE.
Jan
3
comment SQL Server - contents of transaction log file in more detail
@NeverStopLearning really? I'm not aware of that. TRUNCATE is a minimally logged operation as in it does not create a log entry for every row deleted (as DELETE would), just the operation itself, but as far as I know you can still do a ROLLBACK safely if you haven't committed yet. Where did you read this? :)
Jan
3
comment SQL Server - contents of transaction log file in more detail
@NeverStopLearning there are some things related to this (such as log truncation during backup, etc), but for the sake of answering your question, it's an "artificial limitation" (if you think about it as a limitation instead of a feature). Please note that if you SET IMPLICIT_TRANSACTIONS you will be able to rollback implicit transactions (and you will be required to explicitly COMMIT them).
Jan
3
comment SQL Server - contents of transaction log file in more detail
@NeverStopLearning You can't rollback commited transactions because that's how Relational Database Management Systems are designed to work: once it's commited, it's durable. I'd suggest you learn more about the theory of transactional processing systems in general and RDBMSs, it's very very interesting and it's going to make your life easier :)