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seen Aug 18 at 16:56
sql must be lowercase.

Aug
18
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comment How to get SQL Server 2012 to use the invariant culture in format()?
Apparently people found nchar(0) to be able to crash SQL Server.
Sep
18
comment Cast to date is sargable but is it a good idea?
I can't help noticing that LINQ2SQL generates SQL where cast(date_column as date) = 'value' when presented with C# similar to where obj.date_column.Date == date_variable.
Sep
15
comment How to get SQL Server 2012 to use the invariant culture in format()?
@JonSeigel Posted, edited in the link.
Sep
15
revised How to get SQL Server 2012 to use the invariant culture in format()?
+ Connect link
Sep
15
comment How to get SQL Server 2012 to use the invariant culture in format()?
I wonder if this should be posted to connect.misrosoft.com now.
Sep
15
comment How to get SQL Server 2012 to use the invariant culture in format()?
Very interesting, thank you.
Aug
18
awarded  Critic
Aug
17
comment How to get SQL Server 2012 to use the invariant culture in format()?
@AaronBertrand Omitting the third parameter, as documented, gives you the result formatted according to your connection language (SET LANGUAGE). Invariant culture is supposed to be invariant accross machines, which makes it perfect for serialization. So it's used on the SQL Server level when it comes to serializing data in some form or another, this includes generating an XML off a query. The 'g' was just an example, I'm not actually using that. And I can emulate the invariantness by escaping the special characters in the format string ('dd\/MM\/yyyy'), but that's not pretty.
Aug
17
asked How to get SQL Server 2012 to use the invariant culture in format()?
Aug
7
comment SSIS package blocks itself if uses TRUNCATE
While the asnwer solves the problem, it does not really connect the dots nicely (and while I think I did connect them, I'm not entirely sure). So let me restate: The problem is that truncate will take schema-stability locks in addition to data locks, whereas delete will only take data locks. When later SSIS goes to validate the schema, it hits the taken schema-stability lock and waits because the connection that verifies metadata is intentionally not enlisted in the distributed transaction. With delete there is no problem because no schema locks were taken in the first place. Correct?
Aug
7
accepted SSIS package blocks itself if uses TRUNCATE
Aug
7
comment SSIS package blocks itself if uses TRUNCATE
@Kin sys.dm_exec_requests doesn't show what is blocking because it's -2. ValidateExternalMetadata solves the problem though, which is a bit surprising because all my OLE DB destinations already were 'Fast Load' which are said to be immune to the problem in the article.
Aug
7
comment SSIS package blocks itself if uses TRUNCATE
@Kin Just tried that, made no difference. As for truncating outside SSIS, I don't really know, because I don't really use distributed transactions outside SSIS; within a non-distributed transaction it works, obviously.
Aug
7
comment SSIS package blocks itself if uses TRUNCATE
@JonSeigel An interesting solution, will tuck away for future use, but will probably not apply here.
Aug
7
asked SSIS package blocks itself if uses TRUNCATE