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Nov
3
answered SQL for Inserting the system date and a fixed time (not the system time) in a column
Oct
29
comment How to validate data before loading it to DB
Is there a reason that you need to do the validation before loading? Normally, you'd stage your load. So you'd load data into a staging area in the database however it exists in the file then a separate step would cleanse the data.
Oct
8
comment Upgrade scenario: Oracle 8.0.5.0.0 to Oracle 12c?
I'm not sure that even ODBC would work. I'm hard-pressed to think of a version of the Oracle client that could be installed on an operating system that can run 12.1 that would be able to connect to an 8.0.5 database.
Oct
7
comment SYSAUX used space close to 100%
@user77642 - That or free up some space most likely. You'd know, presumably, if a large amount of the "used space" was allocated by not used because, for example, you purged a lot of data from the audit trail recently.
Oct
7
answered SYSAUX used space close to 100%
Oct
5
comment How to turn VARBINARY within PeopleSoft into a string?
OK. Updated the question to indicate that it's a SQL Server question not an Oracle question.
Oct
5
revised How to turn VARBINARY within PeopleSoft into a string?
added 4 characters in body; edited tags
Oct
5
comment How to turn VARBINARY within PeopleSoft into a string?
varbinary isn't an Oracle data type. I would guess that you mean either LONG RAW or BLOB.
Oct
5
comment How to turn VARBINARY within PeopleSoft into a string?
The text of your question says the data type is MIMEDATALONG. The title of your question seems to indicate that it is a LONG RAW. It seems unlikely that PeopleSoft would define a new type since it tends to be pretty database agnostic. Are the strings longer than 4000 bytes? If so, is getting just the first 4000 bytes sufficient?
Oct
5
comment Oracle: Performance centric ways to notify user on reaching “logical” lock expiration event
This seems like a bad idea architecturally. If you want to implement pessimistic locking, lock the row. If you want to implement optimistic locking, do that. Creating a separate table and managing your own locks does not sound sensible. If you really, really want to do that, your job could send a message via Oracle AQ that goes to a JMS queue on the middle tier or your job could delete the row from the lock table while the middle tier is subscribed to changes to that table. But neither of these approaches would strike me as particularly reasonable.
Oct
2
comment Oracle scheduler runs only once
Are you saying that you believe that the job did not actually run at 10:17 despite the fact that the data dictionary indicates that it did run and was successful? I'd add logging to your code to find out what is going wrong. The when others then rollback would be my prime suspect.
Oct
2
comment Oracle scheduler runs only once
Are you saying that you believe that the job did not actually run at 10:17 despite the fact that the data dictionary indicates that it did run and was successful? That seems unlikely. I'd wager that something in your procedure is incorrect. Perhaps an exception is being thrown and silently ignored for example.
Sep
30
comment Single Clustered Index Concept
@waleedansari - If you created an indexed view that had 1 GB of data, the clustered index would occupy ~1 GB of space on disk (memory generally implies RAM not disk). I can't imagine a scenario where you would want to create an indexed view that was updatable, not sure that's even possible. If it is then, yes, SQL Server would update the data in the underlying table. Far, far more common would be that SQL Server has to replicate changes to the table in the indexed view.
Sep
30
revised Single Clustered Index Concept
edited title
Sep
30
answered Single Clustered Index Concept
Sep
30
revised Single Clustered Index Concept
deleted 180 characters in body; edited tags
Sep
24
comment Wrong result with Oracle left join restrictions
It sounds to me like you're describing the standard behavior of a left join according to the SQL standard. But it's hard to say for sure because you haven't provided a reproducible test case that we can run. I'd guess that you could reproduce the issue with 2 tables each having a couple columns and a handful of rows of data and a 3 or 4 line SQL statement. If you can, then it's probably much easier to explain and the explanation will be much clearer.
Sep
22
comment Need to clean up my Oracle database
I'm not sure that I understand what "By clean up, I mean the metadata of the tables" means. Perhaps you mean that you want to retain the metadata but remove all the data? From every table? Or just some tables (it seems likely that you'd need some tables to remain populated). I'm not sure why you would test on a production database. But presumably you can just do a fresh install of your application which will, presumably, install whatever lookup data you need.
Sep
18
comment Asking SQL schema by FOIA
When you say "schema", are you talking about the data model (i.e. just the DDL required to create the tables)? Or including the data as well? Either one is likely to be problematic from a security standpoint but the data is obviously a bigger risk.
Sep
16
comment is there a way to connect to mysql using oracle sqlplus instant client
The functionality might have existed some time back in the 9.x days (though ODBC on linux adds some extra complexity). That version of Oracle has been desupported for a long time so it's not going to be publicly available. You'd need to log a support ticket with Oracle (which assumes you have an active support contract). And it almost certainly won't be supported on any vaguely recent version of Linux. You'd have to be installing a version of Linux from back when 9i was supported which is probably roughly a decade ago.