101 reputation
2
bio website adam-robinson.net
location Charlotte, NC
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen Oct 3 at 15:47

I'm a developer in a small software firm in Charlotte, NC.


Jul
20
comment Why do wildcards in GROUP BY statements not work?
Gotcha. I was actually asking if there were, since I have experience with far fewer RDBMS's than I would imagine most of the people answering questions on this site would have ;) But that was my suspicion.
Jul
20
comment Why do wildcards in GROUP BY statements not work?
Can you mention a couple of RDBMS's that implement that portion of the standard as written? I know, for example, that MySQL will allow you (given the proper settings) to include items not within the GROUP BY clause in the SELECT list, but it leaves it undefined as to which row that value will come from (so if the column or expression isn't functionally dependent upon the grouping expression, then it could come from any row within the group).
Apr
18
comment Why do people recommend not using the name “Id” for an identity column?
@JNK: That seem a bit of a silly example. I agree with your overall sentiment, but if you were to stop putting air in the tires (or at least gas in the tank), you would, without question (and in the case of gas, without much delay), realize that it's a bad idea. The same is not true of this situation; it's certainly possible that the decision could come back to bite, it's by no means a guarantee.
Sep
4
comment Why is there still a varchar data type?
@R.. you're certainly entitled to your opinion, but the fact remains that nvarchar columns have poorer performance than equivalent varchar columns in many RDBMS's (my experience is with SQL Server, but I have heard of implications in Oracle as well; no idea bout DB2, Sybase, etc.). If the data truly won't need the wider character set of unicode, then there's no point in suffering the performance impact.
Sep
4
comment Why is there still a varchar data type?
@R..: I can store an image in a varchar column encoded in base-64. I can store text data in four-byte blocks using int columns, but that isn't the point; if you're disregarding the data type of the field, the argument is meaningless.
Sep
4
comment Why is there still a varchar data type?
@R..: varchar allows for a single byte per character. The UTF-8 character set cannot be represented witha single byte, as UTF-8 is a variable length encoding. The characters that UTF-8 shares with ASCII are all a single byte (and the same value as ASCII), but the other characters are not.
Sep
3
comment Why is there still a varchar data type?
@RLH: You can't store true UTF-8 data in a varchar column, as UTF-8 is a variable-length encoding. UTF-8's advantage is that the ASCII character set is identical, so they can all be represented by a single byte. But not all characters can be represented in a single byte.
Sep
2
comment Why is there still a varchar data type?
@RLH: The fact is that you can pick speed or size, but not both. Variable-length encodings (which all Unicode encodings other than UTF-32 are) add overhead when it comes to parsing. Among other things, character-offset memory optimizations cannot be made because the characters are of an unknown length. This makes parsing slow, which makes searching slower. Assuming UTF-32 for everything could make it faster, but data that fits perfectly well within ASCII would suddenly be four times its original size.
Feb
12
awarded  Supporter
Feb
1
awarded  Autobiographer