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visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Jul 4 at 10:03

May
6
comment MySQL - HDD size
No, you can't run an executable in MySQL. If you don't have privileges to reconfigure the server, then you can't get that information.
May
6
comment MySQL - HDD size
There is a UDF available (User Defined Function) called sys_exec (google fu > mysql sys_exec UDF). You can try to install it and then query your OS for the information. There's no out of the box solution for this in MySQL, nor is it needed really.
May
6
comment MySQL - HDD size
You can't ask MySQL to provide you with system information such as available disk space. You can ask it to tell you how much it's using, not what the total is.
Feb
17
comment How to store a database table in multiple disks with assigned ratio?
What's the point of that? I can't muster out words to describe how terribly pointless this thing you're trying to do is.
Jan
3
comment What are the steps to change tables engines from MyISAM to InnoDB?
@a_horse_with_no_name - pay close attention. He's running one statement after another, most likely in the same script. He'll never be able to select something that's being inserted/updated, it's simply being executed in the transaction of its own and php waits for it to finish before moving onto next query. That's what I meant. Of course you can select something being updated using InnoDB, that's the whole point of it. The context of the question is really simple, I'm not arguing who's got bigger e-peen here, I'm simply seeing why someone makes wrong conclusion about table/row level locking.
Jan
3
comment What are the steps to change tables engines from MyISAM to InnoDB?
@a_horse_with_no_name - so you can perfectly fine select a record that hasn't yet been inserted? Makes perfect sense, care to show how it's done? I wasn't able to select something that doesn't exist yet.
Jan
3
comment What are the steps to change tables engines from MyISAM to InnoDB?
How did you determine the whole table is locked?
Jan
3
comment What are the steps to change tables engines from MyISAM to InnoDB?
InnoDB is a transactional engine. When using InnoDB without any special options, it runs in auto commit mode, meaning that every query is isolated in the transaction of its own. To translate this to our mortal language, that means until the insert/update is done - you can't select (which for insert makes sense). However, this is expected functionality, which leads to conclusion that you're having an XY problem here.
Jun
5
awarded  Commentator
May
13
comment Mysql reliable with 1000 new entries / minute?
@JackGajanan - no it won't, do you know the implication of providing false information? The performance, no matter what RDBMS you use is in the end in 99.9% cases due to HDD subsystem.
May
13
comment Mysql reliable with 1000 new entries / minute?
It's sad that in 14 years you still display knowledge of a person who works in the field for 3 months. You actually have 0 idea of what you're talking about. Could you please get some information about the software you're using and the one you're comparing it with? It's simply gibberish what you wrote, it's sad to read.
May
13
comment Mysql reliable with 1000 new entries / minute?
@JackGajanan - how long have you been in IT? 3 months?
May
6
comment Index optimization
PRIMARY KEY has only one job and that's what you said earlier - uniqueness. It just exists so you can distinguish between rows. Now, having an autoincremented integer is the easiest method to implement this kind of behaviour. Also, the smart guys that developed InnoDB used the integer-auto_incremented PK to also boost performance. To keep it short, there's nothing wrong with your DB schema, I doubt you can do much there except min/max maybe, but personally I wouldn't change anything.
Apr
30
comment MySQL not using resources?
How did you test for I/O?
Mar
13
comment Can I move up rows in the memory itself?
It is, you think your idea is a good solution so you're looking for means to do that. I can tell you immediately that whenever you want to tamper with how database stores something, you're 100% doing something wrong. There is not a single exception to this rule. Moving rows up and down for some reason is a terrible idea. You should structure the table in such a way that when you query it - you get it in the order you specified. It would be much easier if you explained in detail what the problem really is.
Mar
13
comment Can I move up rows in the memory itself?
This is such an xy problem, you should probably rethink your design. It's also very, very difficult to understand what the goal behind your idea is.
Aug
13
comment error 1118: row size too large. utf8 innodb
Can you post the output of SHOW CREATE TABLE tablename so we can try and replicate the problem at our machines?
Aug
10
comment error 1118: row size too large. utf8 innodb
Is this InnoDB or MyISAM?
May
16
comment Why doesn't InnoDB store the row count?
@SoboLAN - no, it wouldn't. Having a service that updates some sort of statistics table at predefined time intervals is much better. Imagine having a large database and several administrators querying most of the tables with SELECT COUNT(*), add a non-optimized WHERE to the table and you'll have a few users bringing the db to its knees for several questionably-useful stat counters.
May
16
awarded  Teacher