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Jul
20
awarded  Autobiographer
Jun
2
comment Benefits of compressed MySQL tables on INSERT-only workload?
No, since you are not selecting or updating that data, InnoDB won't keep it in buffer pool therefore it won't waste RAM on it. Since you wrote it once, no I/O is spent on it after it's written, and since you never access it - no I/O is spent on it.
Jun
1
comment Benefits of compressed MySQL tables on INSERT-only workload?
MySQL keeps working data set in RAM (InnoDB). You'd save space, if you never use those for anything except for archiving. I'd consider using archive engine. That's about it regarding the question, you will get less hassle transferring / backing up the data due to lower size, but you won't get any performance boost if you compress unused data.
Nov
27
comment How can I speed up an sql query that round trips between two tables
@Pintouch - MyISAM is an old engine which worked great for the time when it was created. The largest difference between MyISAM and InnoDB is the fact that InnoDB is able to store working data set in RAM - that's the magic innodb_buffer_pool_size setting. MySQL is being shipped with default values so it can work on really, really old and slow hardware. If not configured properly, it will yield abysmal performance. If tuned properly, it will yield incredible performance. InnoDB (tuned) outperforms MyISAM in every possible aspect. And yes, it even has that famed fulltext search supported.
Nov
27
comment How can I speed up an sql query that round trips between two tables
@Pintouch what you wrote is an abomination, horrible and most of all - completely not true. On top of researching what InnoDB does and how it stacks up against MyISAM, I suggest that you consider removing your comment.
Oct
17
comment How many requeries/second can my server handle?
@gr3g - that's also another tricky question because you can have issues with CPU (very easy to handle) or problems with hard drive I/O capabilities (when it comes to databases). This (usually) boils down to periodic server querying to see what's going on with CPU, RAM and HDD. And as you can see, this is why this question should be moved to either dba or superuser SXE sites.
Oct
17
comment How many requeries/second can my server handle?
@PatrickQ - it is. The answer is backed up with facts on why the concrete answer can't be given.
Oct
17
comment How many requeries/second can my server handle?
If you think logically, what part, besides software, has to do with how many requests per second something can do? Could it be hardware? Could it be the type of request? It's not like every request is the same, is it? It's only natural that they can't tell you. They don't know unless they measure it. And measuring something like that isn't trivial as you may think.
Sep
25
comment Speed Up Index Creation in MySQL
Don't use MyISAM. Use an SSD. Rethink your strategy. Recreating a table with 25m records on a daily basis sounds like wrong app. architecture.
May
6
comment MySQL - HDD size
No, you can't run an executable in MySQL. If you don't have privileges to reconfigure the server, then you can't get that information.
May
6
comment MySQL - HDD size
There is a UDF available (User Defined Function) called sys_exec (google fu > mysql sys_exec UDF). You can try to install it and then query your OS for the information. There's no out of the box solution for this in MySQL, nor is it needed really.
May
6
comment MySQL - HDD size
You can't ask MySQL to provide you with system information such as available disk space. You can ask it to tell you how much it's using, not what the total is.
Feb
17
comment How to store a database table in multiple disks with assigned ratio?
What's the point of that? I can't muster out words to describe how terribly pointless this thing you're trying to do is.
Jan
3
comment What are the steps to change tables engines from MyISAM to InnoDB?
@a_horse_with_no_name - pay close attention. He's running one statement after another, most likely in the same script. He'll never be able to select something that's being inserted/updated, it's simply being executed in the transaction of its own and php waits for it to finish before moving onto next query. That's what I meant. Of course you can select something being updated using InnoDB, that's the whole point of it. The context of the question is really simple, I'm not arguing who's got bigger e-peen here, I'm simply seeing why someone makes wrong conclusion about table/row level locking.
Jan
3
comment What are the steps to change tables engines from MyISAM to InnoDB?
@a_horse_with_no_name - so you can perfectly fine select a record that hasn't yet been inserted? Makes perfect sense, care to show how it's done? I wasn't able to select something that doesn't exist yet.
Jan
3
comment What are the steps to change tables engines from MyISAM to InnoDB?
How did you determine the whole table is locked?
Jan
3
comment What are the steps to change tables engines from MyISAM to InnoDB?
InnoDB is a transactional engine. When using InnoDB without any special options, it runs in auto commit mode, meaning that every query is isolated in the transaction of its own. To translate this to our mortal language, that means until the insert/update is done - you can't select (which for insert makes sense). However, this is expected functionality, which leads to conclusion that you're having an XY problem here.
Jun
5
awarded  Commentator
May
13
comment Mysql reliable with 1000 new entries / minute?
@JackGajanan - no it won't, do you know the implication of providing false information? The performance, no matter what RDBMS you use is in the end in 99.9% cases due to HDD subsystem.
May
13
comment Mysql reliable with 1000 new entries / minute?
It's sad that in 14 years you still display knowledge of a person who works in the field for 3 months. You actually have 0 idea of what you're talking about. Could you please get some information about the software you're using and the one you're comparing it with? It's simply gibberish what you wrote, it's sad to read.