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29
awarded  Caucus
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1
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
14
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
27
awarded  Notable Question
Nov
5
awarded  Popular Question
Oct
30
awarded  Notable Question
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28
awarded  Popular Question
Sep
12
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
16
accepted Why is there ASYNC_NETWORK_IO wait type on Shared Memory connections?
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
20
awarded  Yearling
Jan
29
revised Does RAM taken up Shared Memory connection counts against Max Server Memory?
added 18 characters in body
Jan
29
asked Does RAM taken up Shared Memory connection counts against Max Server Memory?
Jan
29
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
28
comment Why is there ASYNC_NETWORK_IO wait type on Shared Memory connections?
@AaronBertrand It was partially answered in the linked question. I just wanted to make sure that this type of wait can also be applied to a non-network issue.
Jan
28
asked Why is there ASYNC_NETWORK_IO wait type on Shared Memory connections?
Jan
27
accepted Is ASYNC_NETWORK_IO wait type anything to worry about?
Jan
24
comment Is ASYNC_NETWORK_IO wait type anything to worry about?
For bullet point 2. The application is on the same box as SQL and the connection is via Shared Memory method. So theoretically that should be super fast.
Jan
24
comment Is ASYNC_NETWORK_IO wait type anything to worry about?
For bullet point 1. The data retrieval is done via ADO.NET using standard code: var dataSet = new DataSet(); var da = new SqlDataAdapter(command); da.Fill(dataSet); So I am not sure what exactly could be slow.
Jan
23
comment Is ASYNC_NETWORK_IO wait type anything to worry about?
@EricHiggins Just a local set of RAIDed hard drives.